Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When I use ifstream to read file, I loop over all lines in the file and close it. Then I try opening a different file with the same ifstream object, it still says the End-Of-File error. I'm wondering why closing the file won't automatically clearing the state for me. I have to call clear() explictly after close() then.

Is there any reason why they design it like this? To me, that's really painful if you wanna reuse the fstream object for different files.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

void main()
{
    ifstream input;
    input.open("c:\\input.txt");

    string line;
    while (!input.eof())
    {
        getline(input, line);
        cout<<line<<endl;
    }

    // OK, 1 is return here which means End-Of-File
    cout<<input.rdstate()<<endl;

    // Why this doesn't clear any error/state of the current file, i.e., EOF here?
    input.close();

    // Now I want to open a new file
    input.open("c:\\output.txt");

    // But I still get EOF error
    cout<<input.rdstate()<<endl;

    while (!input.eof())
    {
        getline(input, line);
        cout<<line<<endl;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Why would you read output ^_^? –  alternative May 1 '11 at 16:17
    
@mathepic, You can always read output file but you cannot write input file. Anyway, that name shouldn't matter:) –  Eric Z May 1 '11 at 16:20
    
I can certainly write to an "input.txt", and read from an "output.txt", but that certainly seems quite an odd thing to do, doesn't it? –  alternative May 1 '11 at 16:53
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The call to close may fail. When it does fail, it sets the failbit. If it reset the state of the stream, you wouldn't be able to check whether or not the call to close succeeded.

share|improve this answer
1  
OK.. But they can set the state only if close fails. –  Eric Z May 1 '11 at 16:33
    
Then they'll have to test all the condition for failure, while with current implementation, only one test for success. –  Dikei May 1 '11 at 17:08
    
But does anyone ever test for close failures? I know I never do. And what do you do if it does fail? –  nbt May 1 '11 at 17:45
add comment

Personally, I think close() should reset the flags, as I've been bitten by this in the past. Still, to mount my hobby-horse once more, your read code is wrong:

while (!input.eof())
 {
    getline(input, line);
    cout<<line<<endl;
 }

should be:

while (getline(input, line))
 {
     cout<<line<<endl;
 }

To see why, consider what happens if you try to read a completely empty file. The eof() call will return false (because although the file is empty, you have not yet read anything, and only reads set the eof bit) and you will output a line which does not exist.

share|improve this answer
    
That's a good point, thanks. –  Eric Z May 1 '11 at 16:33
add comment

Because the flags are associated with the stream, not the file.

share|improve this answer
add comment

This has been changed in C++11 (C++0x), not so that close() discards any errors detected but the next open() will call clear() for you.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.