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I have code similar to the following.

using (MyEntities context = new MyEntities())
{
    var activities = from act in context.Activities
                     where act.ActTwittered == false
                     select new { act.ActID, act.ActTitle, act.Category, act.ActDateTime, act.Location };

    foreach (var activity in activities)
    {
        /* ... */
    }
}

This seems to work fine but my loop has a lot of processing. I'm concerned that I'm leaving a database connection or other resources open during this processing.

I tried declaring var activities before the using statement so I could process the data after the using statement, but this variable must be initialized where it is declared.

Could someone who understands the inner workings of EF tell me if there are problems doing lengthy processing while an EF context is "alive", and how I make alleviate these problems.

While I'm at it, perhaps you could also comment on the fact that I use act.Category.CatName within the loop. This is a value from a related table. Am I better to use a join in my EF query so I get the data all at once rather than forcing another (?) database access to get the related data?

share|improve this question
1  
In general, if you are doing joins of data in code that you can do within a query, you should do it within the query. As far as your "activities" variable, just declare it outside the using() with the specific type that the instance will be set to. –  Joe May 1 '11 at 17:24
2  
@joe, I think there is no specific type here since the OP mentioned Anonymous Types. –  Caspar Kleijne May 1 '11 at 17:27
    
@Casper: Yes, that was the issue. –  Jonathan Wood May 1 '11 at 17:30
    
Ah, I see (missed the new in your LINQ expression). Hm. –  Joe May 1 '11 at 17:37

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your problem is in wanting the anonymous type to be accessible outside of its context. You can use a specific type for your results and get the flexibility to access the values anywhere.

public class ActivitySummary
{
    public int ActID { get; set; }
    public string ActTitle { get; set; }
    public string Category { get; set; }
    public DateTime ActDateTime { get; set; }
    public string Location { get; set; }
}

. . .

List<ActivitySummary> activities;

using (MyEntities context = new MyEntities())
{
    activities = from act in context.Activities
                 where act.ActTwittered == false
                 select new ActivitySummary { act.ActID, act.ActTitle, act.Category, act.ActDateTime, act.Location }.ToList();

}

foreach (var activity in activities)
{
    /* ... */
}
share|improve this answer
    
On looking at my answer, inside the initializer, you may need to use ActID = act.ActID, etc. I do not remember if the initializer will use a referenced property name. –  BJ Safdie May 1 '11 at 17:41
    
This seems reasonable. However, wouldn't ToList() need to construct an entirely new data structure and copy all the data over? That seems horribly inefficient. Of course, I'm starting to get used to inefficiency when working with EF. –  Jonathan Wood May 1 '11 at 17:41
    
It is LINQ with deferred execution, so the ToList or ToArray is a single, first iteration of the result set to pull back the actual values for later use. –  BJ Safdie May 1 '11 at 17:47
    
@BJ: I'm very curious in understanding this. Are you saying this causes the data to be read directly into the list or array, without having to copy it from the collection that is normally created? –  Jonathan Wood May 1 '11 at 17:49
    
Yes, LINQ does not execute the query until the data is accessed. Then the data is returned using "yield return" to return each item without an intermediate collection. So, in this case ToList creates a List, then iterates through the query adding a new item for each result. Each result is not in an intermediate collection, but is returned via a (my guess) "yield return reader.Read() //SqlDataReader". msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/9k7k7cf0(v=vs.80).aspx –  BJ Safdie May 1 '11 at 18:01

You can have the compiler infer the result type by calling a generic method on it:

    public static T CallFunc<T>( Func<T> theFunc )
    {
        return theFunc();
    }

    ... 

    var activities = CallFunc( () =>
    {
        using( var context = new MyEntities() )
        {
            return 
                (
                    from act in context.Activities
                    where act.ActTwittered == false
                    select new { act.ActID, act.ActTitle, act.Category, act.ActDateTime, act.Location };
                )
                .ToList();
        }
    } );

    foreach( var a in activities ) ...

Don't forget the .ToList() at the end, or your query won't be actually executed until you enumerate over it, which will happen after the context is closed.

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The biggest problem with separating the reading and processing, is that your code doesn't do that at all.

The first statement only creates an expression that is capable of fetching the data, but it doesn't actually fetch anything at all. It's not until you start reading from it that it actually gets any data.

There are two things that you have to do to be able to close the database connection before processing the data with that code. You have to actually get the data instead of just setting up an expression, by using the ToList method, and you have to use Dispose instead of using so that you don't isolate the anonymous type inside it's scope:

MyEntities context = new MyEntities();

var activities = (
  from act in context.Activities
  where act.ActTwittered == false
  select new { act.ActID, act.ActTitle, act.Category, act.ActDateTime, act.Location }
).ToList();

context.Dispose();

foreach (var activity in activities) {
    /* ... */
}

One drawback with this approach is that you don't get the implicit try...finally around the code that the using provides, so if there is an error when fetching the data, the context won't be disposed.

Another alternative is to declare a class that can hold the data that you read, so that you can declare the variable using a known class, outside the using block:

List<Activity> activities;
using (MyEntities context = new MyEntities()) {
  activities = (
    from act in context.Activities
    where act.ActTwittered == false
    select new Activity(act.ActID, act.ActTitle, act.Category, act.ActDateTime, act.Location)
  ).ToList();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I'm well aware of the drawbacks of not using using. Which is why I was using it. :) It's starting to look like the second suggestion is about the only way. However, wouldn't ToList() need to construct an entirely new data structure and copy all the data over? That seems horribly inefficient. Of course, I'm starting to get used to inefficiency when working with EF. –  Jonathan Wood May 1 '11 at 17:45
    
@Jonathan Wood: The ToList method will do some copying when constructing the list, but it's not much. More importantly, as the list contains objects, it's only the reference to the objects that are copied, not the objects themselves. –  Guffa May 1 '11 at 17:56
    
Okay, I think some variation on this is the answer. Thanks. –  Jonathan Wood May 1 '11 at 17:59

In cases when I need to work with result from DB for a long time I usually create that specific type, just declare a class with needed fields, not using anonymous types, after I get data from database, I spawn a thread where I do the needed work. This way the connection to database gets closed and application remains responsive.

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It makes sense to create the specific type. But I'm not sure I get how starting a new thread helps in any way the database getting closed. –  Jonathan Wood May 1 '11 at 17:50
    
by starting the new thread you are actually exiting the using statement and the connection closes. All your processing now will work on a different thread than the main one of you app. –  Eugen May 1 '11 at 18:10
    
But I exit the using statement even if I don't create a new thread. In fact, if I start a new thread and pass it data from within the using, that data wouldn't be available when the main thread exits the using block. –  Jonathan Wood May 1 '11 at 18:40

You could manually dispose your DataContext.

In addition, you will need to call ToArray on the query so that it gets executed immidiately (and not after disposing the context):

MyEntities context = new MyEntities();

var activities = (from act in context.Activities
                  where act.ActTwittered == false
                  select new { act.ActID, act.ActTitle, act.Category, act.ActDateTime, act.Location })
                 .ToArray();

context.Dispose();

//Do something with activities

However, I would recommend switching to non-anonymous types so you can continue using using to dispose the Context.
For example, using takes care to call Dispose even if an exception occurs.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there a recommended way to define a non-anonymous type without having to modify my query to pull in a bunch of columns that I don't need here? Also, if calling context.Dispose() requires calling ToArray(), isn't that still needed if I use the data after the using block? –  Jonathan Wood May 1 '11 at 17:35
1  
If something within the query caused the .ToArray() to from an exception .Dispose() would not be called. –  Matthew Whited May 1 '11 at 17:35
    
You can still write something like "select new Entry { Id = act.ActID, Title = act.ActTitle /*, and so on*/ }" where Entry is a custom type. –  Matthias May 1 '11 at 17:36

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