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While checking LINQ's abilities I've wrote simple QuickSort implementation and
was glad that ultimately quick sort function fits in one line.
However I've noticed that performance of this "one line" function significantly differ from my original "straight-forward" version.

Here is the code that calls quick sort function in a loop 10 times:

var r = new Random(DateTime.Now.Millisecond);
Stopwatch watch = new Stopwatch();
for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
    watch.Reset();
    var randomA = new int[100].Select(x => r.Next(100)).ToList();

    watch.Start();                
    var sorted = QuickSort<int>(randomA);
    watch.Stop();

    Console.WriteLine("Duration: {0} ms", watch.ElapsedMilliseconds);
}

Console.ReadLine();

And two implementations of QuickSort function with Output results:

Simple version:

IEnumerable<T> QuickSort<T>(IEnumerable<T> a) where T : IComparable<T>
{
    if (a.Count() <= 1) return a;

    var pivot = a.First();
    IEnumerable<T> lesser = a.Skip(1).Where(x => x.CompareTo(pivot) < 0);
    IEnumerable<T> bigger = a.Skip(1).Where(x => x.CompareTo(pivot) >= 0);

    return QuickSort(lesser).Concat(new T[] { pivot }).Concat(QuickSort(bigger));
}

Output
Duration: 22 ms
Duration: 3 ms
Duration: 3 ms
Duration: 3 ms
Duration: 3 ms
Duration: 3 ms
Duration: 2 ms
Duration: 2 ms
Duration: 3 ms
Duration: 3 ms

One Line implementation:

IEnumerable<T> QuickSort<T>(IEnumerable<T> a) where T : IComparable<T>
{
    return a.Count() <= 1 ? a :                 
        QuickSort(a.Skip(1).Where(i => i.CompareTo(a.First()) < 0)).
        Concat(new T[] { a.First() }).                          
        Concat(QuickSort(a.Skip(1).Where(i => i.CompareTo(a.First()) >= 0)));  
}

Output
Duration: 24154 ms
Duration: 407 ms
Duration: 2281 ms
Duration: 2420 ms
Duration: 919 ms
Duration: 48777 ms
Duration: 4615 ms
Duration: 3115 ms
Duration: 1311 ms
Duration: 1631 ms

Why such a big difference in the performance?

share|improve this question
    
In real code use new Random(); instead of passing the millisecond as a seed (that only allows for 1000 different seeds!). That aside, it's better to test with fixed seeds. That way you can guarantee one algorithm was not lucky to get the best cases, and the other the worst cases. Even though I don't think that's the problem here, it is something you should care about. –  R. Martinho Fernandes May 1 '11 at 18:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The reason is that you are re-calculating a.First() everytime - if you factor this out again like this:

public static IEnumerable<T> QuickSort<T>(IEnumerable<T> a) 
    where T : IComparable<T>
{
    if (a.Count() <= 1) return a;
    var pivot = a.First();
    return QuickSort(a.Skip(1).Where(i => i.CompareTo(pivot) < 0))
        .Concat(new T[] { pivot })
        .Concat(QuickSort(a.Skip(1).Where(i => i.CompareTo(pivot) >= 0)));
}

Then the performance is the same.


To clarify with an experiment - using an interceptor with a (trivialized, just for this experiment, don't use this at home, it's wrong) implementation of First() we can see how many times in fact First() is called.

public static class TestHelper
{
    public static int firstCalledCounter = 0;
    public static TSource First<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source) 
    {
        firstCalledCounter++;
        Console.WriteLine("First called " + firstCalledCounter);
        IList<TSource> list = source as IList<TSource>;
        if (list != null)
        {
            if (list.Count > 0)
            {
                return list[0];
            }
            else return default(TSource);
        }
        else return default(TSource);
    }
}

This reveals that in the "one liner" a.First() is called 236376 times, while in the version where we factor out a.First() it is called 98 times. This explains the performance difference.

share|improve this answer
2  
And I think you can still put it in a single line with a let-like Select(). –  R. Martinho Fernandes May 1 '11 at 18:11

A major offender in general for both examples is this (note this does not answer the question, as changing this operation would have an impact on both examples):

if (a.Count() <= 1) return a;

Here, you are simply checking to see if you have one item, and yet, you are calling Count. In the event that the IEnumerable<T> implementation does implement ICollection<T>, it will enumerate through the list every time.

Since you are calling this recursively, you end up iterating through all of the items in the sequence when you don't really have to.

Rather, you should do this:

if (!a.Skip(1).Any()) return a;

This way, you only iterate through two items at most (skipping the first, checking the existence of a second) to determine whether or not you have at most one item in the sequence.

Note that for large values of N, you will run into the same issues as you do with Count; it is an optimization here because the value of N is so small.

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