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I am trying to create a scipr which would enable either writing on stdout or in file. Is it somehow possible to write to each via the same snippet instead of using print for stdou and io.write() for files?

Examples of both:

out_file = open("test.txt", "wt")
out_file.write("Text")
out_file.close()

and

print("Text", file=sys.stdout)
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2  
You can pass any file-like object as print's file argument, what's the problem? – Cat Plus Plus May 1 '11 at 19:01
    
hwo can I pass it via string? when storing sys.stdout/file in string it will write AttributeError: 'str' object has no attribute 'write'. Not sure how to transform it to file-like object – Blackie123 May 1 '11 at 19:07
    
Of course you need to open it first. Behaviour depends on the mode: docs.python.org/py3k/library/functions.html#open – Cat Plus Plus May 1 '11 at 19:07
up vote 1 down vote accepted

is this what you want?

from __future__ import print_function, with_statement
def my_print(text, output):
    if type(output) == str:
        with open(output, 'w') as output_file:
            print(text, file=output_file)
    elif type(output) == file:
        print(text, file=output)
    else:
        raise IOError

I think I understand, maybe this:

from __future__ import print_function, with_statement
def my_print(text, output):
    if type(output) == str:
        try:
            output_file = eval(output)
            assert type(output_file) == file
        except (NameError, AssertionError):
            output_file = open(output, 'w')
        print(text, file=output_file)
        output_file.close()
    elif type(output) == file:
        print(text, file=output)
    else:
        raise IOError

with this you can pass the string 'sys.stdout' to the function and it will first try to take it as a file (from system or previously opened), if it raises a NameError, it opens it as a new file

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