Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to know how to create a contract with the caller for the Method parameter in the event the method has parameters itself. So that I use...

ClassA {
  String string_ = "HI";

  public static void subscribe(Object class, Method action) {
    action.invoke(class, string_);
  }
}

ClassB {

  ClassB() {
    ClassA.subscribe(this, this.getClass().getMethod("load", String.class));
  }

  public void load(String input) {
    if(input.equals("HI")) { 
      ... 
    }
  }
}

I would like to know how to ensure the Method passed as "action" takes String as a parameter (i.e. ensure Method action == load(String){})? Is there something like this available:

public static void subscribe(Object class, Method action(String.class)) {

I want to do it in the method signature of subscribe so that it is obvious to the calling class (ClassB) that it needs to be prepared to take an argument of specified type.

EDIT: Updated last code bit so not to appear as if Method was generic. Poor choice of using <> on my part to represent an example of what I was trying to convey.

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There's no way to do that in Java. The Method class is not generic, and there is no way for it to be so, because methods can take any number of parameters, and there is no way to make a class generic over a variable number of types.

Probably the best you can do is to declare your own type to use instead of Method:

public interface Action<T, P> {
    public void invoke(T target, P parameter);
}

Then:

public static <T> void subscribe(T obj, Action<T, String> action) {
    action.invoke(obj, string_);
}

ClassB() {
    ClassA.subscribe(this, new Action<ClassB, String>() {
        public void invoke(ClassB target, String parameter) {
            target.load(parameter);
        }
    });
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1. Oh! and methods in interfaces are implicitely public. –  Laurent Pireyn May 1 '11 at 19:47
    
@Laurent: True, but i a wise man once wrote "explicit is better than implicit", and my feeling is that declaring methods in interfaces is one of the times that's true. –  Tom Anderson May 1 '11 at 19:54
    
I accepted this as the answer since it correctly answered that there was no way to do this in Java and why, and gave a possible solution. Everyone seemed to use the command pattern in one way or another so I have them all a point up as a partial solution. –  John S. May 1 '11 at 20:55
add comment

In C# there are means to achieve what you are trying to do but I can't think of a way to ensure that at compile time for java.

can you resort to using intefaces?

interface ILoader{
   void load(String input);
}

ClassA {
  String string_ = "HI";

  public static void subscribe(ILoader loader) {
    loader.load( string_);
  }
}

ClassB implements ILoader {

  ClassB() {
    ClassA.subscribe(this);
  }

  public void load(String input) {
    if(input.equals("HI")) { 
      ... 
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Couldn't you use a slight modification of the Command Pattern?

puclic interface LoadCommand {
  public load(String input);
}

public class ClassB implements LoadCommand {
  public load(String input) {
    // do stuff here
  }
}

public class ClassA {

  String myInput = "HI";

  public static void subscribe(LoadCommand command) {
    command.load(myInput)
  }
}

The load method in the LoadCommand interface takes one String argument.

share|improve this answer
    
That's not quite Command, as i understand it, because the method on the Command interface is taking a parameter. Part of the point of of Command is that it's self-contained; anything parameter-like is already packed into the Command object. –  Tom Anderson May 1 '11 at 22:10
    
@Tom Anderson: you're right. I changed my answer saying "a slight modification of the Command Pattern" –  MarcoS May 2 '11 at 5:54
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.