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As the title says, is it possible to generate computed values for properties when using Data Annotation Validation in ASP.NET MVC (3)?

Consider a credit card example. The credit card must have an expiration date, usually of Month and Year. In the user interface it's generally best to have select fields for the user to pick from instead of text fields. On the other side however when sending the data to a payment gateway, it's usually one string in multiple formats: M/Y; MM/YY; MM/YYYY; etc.

So what I want to accomplish is to generate the final string after I've validated the two individual dates.

Anyway, it would be awesome if someone can point me in the right direction. I've only used the built in attributes, so I guess treat me as a nubski when it comes to something custom like this.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assuming you have Month and Year properties:

[Range(1, 12)]
public int Month { get; set; }
[Range(2011, 2100)]
public int Year { get; set; }

you could have a third property on your view model which represents the required value:

public string ExpirationDate
{
    get 
    {
        return new DateTime(Year, Month, 1).ToString("MM/yyyy");
    }
}

So, once your view model has successfully passed validation you could send the ExpirationDate property to the payment gateway:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Pay(PayViewModel model)
{
    if (!ModelState.IsValid)
    {
        return View(model);
    }
    PaymentGateway.Pay(model.CCNumber, model.ExpirationDate);
    return RedirectToAction("Success");
}
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What if the computed property was also a database property that must be set and saved? Or alternatively, should I just not bother with a computed property and create two separate columns in the database? –  Alex May 1 '11 at 20:23
    
@Alex, that depends. I think it would be better to have separate columns in the database but without sufficient context about your exact scenario it is difficult to say for sure. –  Darin Dimitrov May 1 '11 at 20:26
    
Hmm, I think I'll go with the dual columns and then compute a complete column with the database. This way, I can avoid saving a string in the database which would be in the wrong format if my app ever has to change gateway providers. Sorry to waste your time, I probably should have spent a bit more time thinking on the database design. –  Alex May 1 '11 at 20:30
    
Scratch the above comment. Thinking on it, I would want to save it as a date column in the database, so back to the original question how can I set the property based on the two independent properties? –  Alex May 1 '11 at 20:34
    
@Alex, you could have the calculated property of type DateTime. Then you can directly save it to the database. Don't forget though that because it is a DateTime there is a Day associated which will always be 1. So simply change the type of the ExpirationDate property to DateTime and don't call the ToString in the getter. Then save the value of this DateTime to the database. –  Darin Dimitrov May 1 '11 at 20:35

Add a property that doesnt show in the GUI, and concatenates your values:

    class CreditCard
{
    public string ExpirationYear { get; set; }
    public string ExpirationMonth { get; set; }

    public string ExpirationDate
    {
        get
        {
            return string.Format("{0}/{1}", ExpirationMonth, ExpirationYear);
        }
    }
}

Or you could use a method in which you supply the format

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