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Written in C (into a C++ project):

I have two projects in VS08 under the same solution. One is a DLL file and the other ("runner") is the a console application for using/testing the DLL file. The header file has a header file with all the functions (__declspec(dllexport)). When I use functions without any arguments, by the runner console application, they run OK. When I try to call a function with arguments I get unable to resolve symbol... error. The strange thing is that VS08 recognizes the function and I can open it from the runner main() with the right-click menu, however it can't find it.

Worth mentioning that I am including the header file and not importing the DLL with function pointers... My feeling is that the functions get renamed somehow in the compiling process and the linker can't find the functions with the arguments. If I would be able to to see the list of new names (inside the object file?) maybe I could include them in the header file to fix this?

Thanks.

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2 Answers

Written in C (into a C++ project):

That's possibly a pretty good lead. A C program cannot consume functions that were written in C++. When you use __declspec(dllexport), the function gets exported with its C++ name. Which is decorated by the compiler, a trick to allow overloaded functions to link properly. A C compiler doesn't apply the same kind of decoration, the linker will complain that it can't find the function.

To make this work, you have to declare the function with the extern "C" declarator. Make the .h file look like this:

#ifdef __cplusplus
  extern "C" {
#endif

#undef DLLEXPORT
#ifdef BUILDING_MYDLL
#  define DLLEXPORT __declspec(dllexport)
#else
#  define DLLEXPORT __declspec(dllimport)
#endif

DLLEXPORT void Foo(int arg);
// etc..

#ifdef __cplusplus
  }
#endif

In your DLL project, use Project + Properties, C/C++, Preprocessor and add BUILDING_MYDLL to the Preprocessor Definitions settings.

A short explanation for this macro madness: the #ifdef __cplusplus ensures that all the DLL declarations are declared extern "C" when they are compiled by the C++ compiler so that they'll match the C compiler symbols. The DLLEXPORT macro ensures that the functions are exported when you build the DLL, imported when you link the DLL import library in another project.

You can get additional troubleshooting from the dumpbin.exe utility by running it with the /exports option on your DLL. It shows the exact names of exported functions. Run it from the Visual Studio command prompt. A mismatch between the names you see in the output verses the linker error messages is a sure sign of trouble.

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First off: Intellisense finding it ('open for the rightclick menu' eeeeck?) is no proof; it proves you put the declaration in a header file;

You are probably right about the name mangling thing: If you have C externals you need to declare them inside an extern "C" {} block:

extern "C" {

    void dostuff(int param1, char* param2);

}

instead of

extern void dostuff(int param1, char* param2);

The most flexible approach is probably to include the extern "C" around the complete C header file conditionally:

// Sample.h
#if defined(__cplusplus)
extern "C"
{
#endif

// Function declarations

#if defined(__cplusplus)
}
#endif 

See MSDN for more info

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