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I was reading one of the thread on this site only and I saw some unusual class definition which I was not able to understand that well. Can somebody please explain me what this definition mean?

public class Node<T> where T : class
{     
  public Node<T> Next { get; set; }    
  public T Value { get; set; }     
  public Node(T value)     
  { 
    Next = null;
    Value = value;    
  } 
} 

especially where it says

public class Node<T> where T : class
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Generic Type Constraint – ChaosPandion May 1 '11 at 20:19
    
possible duplicate of C# where keyword – ChaosPandion May 1 '11 at 20:24

It's a Generic class definition with a generic parameter T with a constraint that T has to be class (reference type).

It essentially means, when you create an instance of Node, you can do

new Node<String>(someStringVar)

but you cannot do

new Node<int>(someIntVar)
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Thank you so much that was helpful:) – CoffeeBean May 1 '11 at 21:49

It defines Node as a generic class where the T generic type is constrained only to reference types.

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where T : class means that T can't be a struct type (including primitive types like int).

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Looks like you've got a linked list node where the node can be of any class. T is a specifier for a generic and the where T : class portion specifies the conditions for the generic. In this case, T must be a class.

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This is called generics

where T : class

means that the type you supply must be a class, you cannot use primitive types. (e.g < int >)

This is defining an object called Next of type Node<T>. If the type Size is supplied when creating an instance of this class it means this property will be Node<Size>.

public Node<T> Next { get; set; }

And this:

public T Value { get; set; }

Would be the same as

public Size Value { get; set; }

See generics on MSDN

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Thank you so much, it was a heloful comment. – CoffeeBean May 1 '11 at 21:50
    
@Californicated the act of up voting already means thanks :P And make sure to accept the answer that answers your question, if any. With the check () under the vote options. – BrunoLM May 1 '11 at 21:55

The T inside the brackets is the generic type parameter. I suggest you read the introduction on genericity for an explanation of the advantages and needs of it.

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Thank you so much the aticle was really helpful.:). – CoffeeBean May 1 '11 at 21:49

T is a generic type argument. The definition is specifying a constraint where T can only be a class, not a struct.

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