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A recent question prompted a discussion centering on arrays and pointers. The question was in reference to scanf("%s", &name) vs scanf("%s", name).

For the following code, Microsoft actually resolves this for you in VS2010 (and maybe earlier versions?),

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    char name[30];

    printf("Scan \"name\" - ");
    scanf("%s", name);
    printf("Print \"&name\" - %s\n", &name);
    printf("Print \"name\"  - %s\n", name);

    printf("Pointer to &name - %p\n", &name);
    printf("Pointer to name  - %p\n", name);

    printf("\n\n");

    printf("Scan \"&name\" - ");
    scanf("%s", &name);
    printf("Print \"&name\" - %s\n", &name);
    printf("Print \"name\"  - %s\n", name);

    printf("Pointer to &name - %p\n", &name);
    printf("Pointer to name  - %p\n", name);

    return 0;
}

Is this actually defined in the ANSI C Standard, or is this allowed to be compiler dependent? Does this work because MS is treating everything as C++? Please ignore buffer overflow issues for now.

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2 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Both name and &name should give the same result. Strictly speaking, only name is valid per the C language standard and &name results in undefined behavior, so you should definitely use name, but in practice both will work.

name is an array, so when you use it as an argument to a function (as you do when you pass it to printf), it "decays" to a pointer to its initial element (which is a char* here).

&name gives you the address of the array; this address is the same as the address of the initial element (because there can be no padding bytes before the initial element of an array or between elements in an array), so &name and name have the same pointer value.

However, they have different types: &name is of type char (*)[30] (a pointer to an array of 30 char) while name, when it decays to a pointer to its initial element, is of type char* (a pointer to a char, in this case, the initial char element of the array name).

Since they have the same value and since the printf and scanf functions reinterpret the argument as a char* anyway, there should be no difference whether you pass name or &name.

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2  
Practically speaking, you're absolutely right. It's probably worth mentioning, however, that officially the mismatch leads to undefined behavior, so it's better to omit it. –  Jerry Coffin May 1 '11 at 20:36
    
@Jerry: I think you're right that the results are undefined so I did add a note, though I'd be surprised if there was an implementation where the representations of &name[0] and &name are different. Their sizes definitely have to be the same. –  James McNellis May 1 '11 at 20:41
    
Yup -- like I said, practically speaking it causes no harm. –  Jerry Coffin May 1 '11 at 20:44
    
This person: stackoverflow.com/questions/5850800/… was having an issue, and it appears that XCode doesn't resolve the address properly, so that prompted my question about the acutal C Standard. –  Jess May 1 '11 at 20:45
1  
I can't reproduce the behavior described in that question. The language standard says that you must pass a char*, so &name is wrong, but I can't imagine that causing problems, especially not when compiling for x86/x64. –  James McNellis May 1 '11 at 20:57
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Undefined Behaviour as per the Standard.

The printf conversion specifier "%p" expects a void*: anything else invokes UB The printf conversion specifier "%s" expects a char* that includes a null byte somewhere inside the object pointed to: anything else invokes UB The scanf conversion specifier "%s" expects a char* with enough space for the input and an extra null terminating byte: anything else invokes UB

If any implementation defines the behaviour, then it should be ok to use in that implementation.

Most often printing a char* or a char(*)[30] instead of a void* with printf("%p") results in a UB manifestation that is indistinguishable from the intended behaviour.

Most often printing a char(*)[30] instead of a char* with printf("%s") results in a UB manifestation that is indistinguishable from the intended behaviour.

From what you say, it appears MS manifestation of UB in these cases is the same as intended.

But it's still Undefined Behaviour.

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The ever thin line between 'Undefined Behaviour' and 'Implementation Defined Behaviour' - if there is a line at all –  sehe May 1 '11 at 20:50
1  
@sehe: If the Standard says it's implementation defined (see, for example, 6.3.2.3/5 in n1256.pdf), then the construct needs to work in a defined way (albeit differently among inplementations) in all implementations. If the Standard says it's undefined (or fails to define the behaviour) there is no need for an implementation to define it -- anything can happen in that case. –  pmg May 1 '11 at 21:01
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