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This code

procedure MyThreadTestA(const AStr: string);

Is faster than

procedure MyThreadTestB(AStr: string);

Whilst doing the same work, both pass a pointer.

However version B 'correctly' updates the referencecount of AStr and makes a copy if I change it.
Version A passes just a pointer and only the compiler prevents me from changing AStr.

Version A is not safe if I do dirty tricks in Assembler or otherwise to circumvent the compiler protection, this is well known but...

Is passed AStr by reference as a const parameters thread safe?
What happens if AStr's reference count in some other thread goes to zero and the string is destroyed?

share|improve this question
3  
If the reference count goes to zero in another thread, then the reference count was wrong to begin with. If two pieces of code can both modify the same string, then the string's reference count should be greater than 1 because there are clearly multiple ways to refer to that string. Each thread should have its own independent variable for refereeing to the string, or else the shared variable should be protected with the usual synchronization techniques. –  Rob Kennedy May 2 '11 at 2:43
    
Very good question. I learned something today. –  Warren P May 2 '11 at 20:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

No, such tricks are not thread-safe. Const prevents the add-ref, so changes by another thread will affect the value in unpredictable ways. Sample program, try altering the const in the definition of P:

{$apptype console}
uses SysUtils, Classes, SyncObjs;

type
  TObj = class
  public
    S: string;
  end;

  TWorker = class(TThread)
  public
    procedure Execute; override;
  end;

var
  lock: TCriticalSection;
  obj: TObj;

procedure P(const x: string);
// procedure P(x: string);
begin
  Writeln('P(1): x = ', x);
  Writeln('Releasing obj');
  lock.Release;
  Sleep(10); // give worker a chance to run
  Writeln('P(2): x = ', x);
end;

procedure TWorker.Execute;
begin
  // wait until TMonitor is freed up
  Writeln('Worker started...');
  lock.Acquire;
  Writeln('worker fiddling with obj.S');
  obj.S := 'bar';
  TMonitor.Exit(obj);
end;

procedure Go;
begin
  lock := TCriticalSection.Create;
  obj := TObj.Create;
  obj.S := 'foo';
  UniqueString(obj.S);
  lock.Acquire;
  TWorker.Create(False);
  Sleep(10); // give worker a chance to run and block
  P(obj.S);
end;

begin
  Go;
end.

But it's not just limited to threads; modifying the underlying variable location has similar effects:

{$apptype console}
uses SysUtils, Classes, SyncObjs;

type
  TObj = class
  public
    S: string;
  end;

var
  obj: TObj;

procedure P(const x: string);
begin
  Writeln('P(1): x = ', x);
  obj.S := 'bar'; 
  Writeln('P(2): x = ', x);
end;

procedure Go;
begin
  obj := TObj.Create;
  obj.S := 'foo';
  UniqueString(obj.S);
  P(obj.S);
end;

begin
  Go;
end.
share|improve this answer

To add to Barry's answer: It is definitely thread-safe if the string that got passed came from a local variable inside the callers scope.

In that case that local variable will hold a valid reference and the only way (assuming just valid pascal code, no fiddling around in asm) for that local variable to be changed is if your call returns.

This also includes all cases where the source of the string variable is the result of a function call (including property access, e.g. TStrings.Strings[]) because in this case the compiler has to store the string in a local temp variable.

Thread-safety problems can only result if you are directly passing a string from a location where that string can be changed (by the same or another thread) before your call returns.

share|improve this answer
    
? if the string var is a local temp var then yes that local temp var is thread safe during your call, but the actual origin of that temp var can still have been changed by another thread when you call return... Now, that can be exactly as you want it, but if you want to ensure that the original string will remain the same while you call your function, you should employ some kind of locking. –  Marjan Venema May 2 '11 at 6:18
    
The question was about passing a string with const and without it and the implications for the thread-safety of access to that string inside the called method. My answer is obviously in the context of the original question. What you are talking about is something completely different that has nothing to do with the original question or my answer. –  Thorsten Engler May 2 '11 at 7:12
    
No argument about that. However there is a very real distinction between a local variable string and a temporary variable with an origin outside the local context. I commented because less multi-thread savvy developers might not pick up on that and might come away thinking that passing a Strings[i] as/to a const argument is "completely" thread-safe. –  Marjan Venema May 2 '11 at 9:03
1  
It is completely thread-safe as far as passing the string is concerned. Access to the TStrings object is not thread-safe, but that goes pretty much without saying. –  Thorsten Engler May 2 '11 at 12:08
    
"pretty much" is what I was addressing... –  Marjan Venema May 2 '11 at 12:20

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