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I am new to iPhone objectiveC development. I am getting memory leaks when I run the following method.

- (NSString *) getDBPath {
    NSArray *paths = NSSearchPathForDirectoriesInDomains(NSDocumentDirectory , NSUserDomainMask, YES);
    NSString *documentsDir = [paths objectAtIndex:0];
    return [documentsDir stringByAppendingPathComponent:@"dbname.sqlite"];
}

and I have found that if I trim it down to just the following... it still leaks

 - (NSString *) getDBPath {
    NSArray *paths = NSSearchPathForDirectoriesInDomains(NSDocumentDirectory , NSUserDomainMask, YES);
    return nil;
}

so i tried releasing the paths variable with the following, which still leaks memory.

 - (NSString *) getDBPath {
    NSArray *paths = NSSearchPathForDirectoriesInDomains(NSDocumentDirectory , NSUserDomainMask, YES);
    [paths release];
    return nil;
}

To detect the leak, I am running it in the profiler with the following loop:

for (int iLoop = 0; iLoop < 30; iLoop++) {
    NSString *dbPath = [self getDBPath];
    [dbPath release];
    sleep(1);
}

The amount of memory associated with NSPathStore2 and NSArrayM continues to grow.

Any suggestions on what I a might be doing wrong? thanks!

share|improve this question
    
What is indicating a leak? The first method you have is completely reasonable and exactly what you should be doing. –  Ben Zotto May 1 '11 at 22:58
    
running it in the profiler, inside of a loop. I just updated the original question above with more details on the loop. –  Steve Stedman May 1 '11 at 23:30
    
NSZombieEnabled still active? Or no NSAutoReleasePool because this runs in the background? –  Matthias Bauch May 1 '11 at 23:54
    
I don't have enlightenment to offer on the actual profiling, but re your test: you shouldn't be releasing the string if you're not retaining it anywhere, and the autorelease pool won't get drained till after the event loop. That said, not sure why you're seeing the leak. –  Ben Zotto May 2 '11 at 23:23
    
i think there would be some other reason, because these lines doesn't leaks with me. –  rptwsthi Jun 10 '11 at 10:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your code for getDBPath is fine, but it is probably called from a context without any autorelease pool.

Fix it by allocating your own pool in the loop code:

NSAutoreleasePool *pool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];
for (int iLoop = 0; iLoop < 30; iLoop++) {
    NSString *dbPath = [self getDBPath];
    // [dbPath release]; // do not release! dbPath will be autoreleased
    sleep(1);
}
[pool drain];
share|improve this answer

you should not release an object you dont own. In your case you are trying to deallocate the memory you have not owned. As in the "paths" always refer to the memory allocated and managed by "NSSearchPathForDirectoriesInDomains" . So you shouldnt be deallocating the memory in this case. Make a general rule unless you allocate a memory by your self you shouldnt be calling releasing the memory for every pointer you use in your program. Hope this helps !

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