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I'm using ConcurrentQueue for a shared data structure which purpose is holding the last N objects passed to it (kind of history).

Assume we have a browser and we want to have the last 100 browsed Urls. I want a queue which automatically drop (dequeue) the oldest (first) entry upon new entry insertion (enqueue) when the capacity gets full (100 addresses in history).

How can I accomplish that using System.Collections ?

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stackoverflow.com/questions/590069/… –  Aryabhatta May 2 '11 at 1:55
    
It wasn't meant specifically for you, but for anyone who comes across this question and might find it useful. btw, it does talk about C# too. Did you manage to read all the answers (in 2 minutes) and figure out that there is no C# code there? Anyway, I am not sure myself, and hence it is a comment... –  Aryabhatta May 2 '11 at 1:57
    
@Moron: Also it's a circular buffer implemented by arrays. I want to implement it using thread-safe ConcurrentQueue –  Xaqron May 2 '11 at 1:58
    
You can just wrap the methods in a lock. Given that they are fast, you can just lock the whole array. This is probably a dupe though. Searching for circular buffer implementations with C# code might find you something. Anyway, good luck. –  Aryabhatta May 2 '11 at 2:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 38 down vote accepted

I would write a wrapper class that on Enqueue would check the Count and then Dequeue when the count exceeds the limit.

 public class FixedSizedQueue<T>
 {
     ConcurrentQueue<T> q = new ConcurrentQueue<T>();

     public int Limit { get; set; }
     public void Enqueue(T obj)
     {
        q.Enqueue(obj);
        lock (this)
        {
           T overflow;
           while (q.Count > Limit && q.TryDequeue(out overflow)) ;
        }
     }
 }
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2  
Why not a while statement in case there is more than one item that needs removal. –  ja72 May 7 '11 at 23:58
1  
Yes, a 'while` is good. Will edit. –  Richard Schneider May 8 '11 at 0:56
1  
q is private to the object, so that the lock will prevent other threads from simultaneous access. –  Richard Schneider Jul 26 '11 at 22:02
1  
@RichardSchneider I recommend you update this to use a private object for locking instead of lock(this); stackoverflow.com/questions/251391/why-is-lockthis-bad –  Lucas B Feb 28 at 22:24
1  
@RichardSchneider If you need to handle concurrency issues yourself then it would be a good idea to swap the ConcurrentQueue<T> object for a Queue<T> object which is more lightweight. –  0b101010 Nov 4 at 13:29

I'd go for a slight variant... extend ConcurrentQueue so as to be able to use Linq extensions on FixedSizeQueue

public class FixedSizedQueue<T> : ConcurrentQueue<T>
{
    private readonly object syncObject = new object();

    public int Size { get; private set; }

    public FixedSizedQueue(int size)
    {
        Size = size;
    }

    public new void Enqueue(T obj)
    {
        base.Enqueue(obj);
        lock (syncObject)
        {
            while (base.Count > Size)
            {
                T outObj;
                base.TryDequeue(out outObj);
            }
        }
    }
}
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1  
Thanks, this is works absolutely brilliantly. I renamed the class to ConcurrentQueueMaxSize. –  Contango Feb 3 '13 at 12:50
    
What happens when TryDequeue fails some reason? –  Richard Schneider Jun 24 at 8:41
    
what happens when someone statically knows the instance as a ConcurrentQueue<T>, they've just circumvented your 'new' keyword. –  mhand Dec 3 at 2:05
    
@mhand If 'someone' wanted to do that; then they would have chosen to use a ConcurrentQueue<T> object to begin with... This is a custom storage class. Nobody is seeking for this to be submitted to the .NET framework. You've sought out to create a problem for the sake of it. –  daveL Dec 3 at 9:52
1  
@mhand Yeah I get what you're saying.. I could wrap a queue and expose the queue's enumerator so as to make use of Linq extensions. –  daveL Dec 8 at 17:06

For anyone who finds it useful, here is some working code based on Richard Schneider's answer above:

public class FixedSizedQueue<T>
{
    private readonly object privateLockObject = new object();

    readonly ConcurrentQueue<T> queue = new ConcurrentQueue<T>();

    public int Size { get; private set; }

    public FixedSizedQueue(int size)
    {
        Size = size;
    }

    public void Enqueue(T obj)
    {
        queue.Enqueue(obj);

        lock (privateLockObject)
        {
            while (queue.Count > Size)
            {
                T outObj;
                queue.TryDequeue(out outObj);
            }
        }
    }
}
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1  
you should never lock on this... what if someone else, heaven forbid, used that instance as a lock too... even better, what if he was waiting for you to enqueue something... deadlock. –  mhand Dec 3 at 2:06
    
You're right! Thanks mhand, I have updated my code example accordingly ;) –  Tod Thomson Dec 3 at 7:12
1  
also, ++ for not subclassing ConcurrentQueue<T> but wrapping it instead! –  mhand Dec 4 at 18:12

For what its worth, here's a lightweight circular buffer with some methods marked for safe and unsafe use.

public class CircularBuffer<T> : IEnumerable<T>
{
    readonly int size;
    readonly object locker;

    int count;
    int head;
    int rear;
    T[] values;

    public CircularBuffer(int max)
    {
        this.size = max;
        locker = new object();
        count = 0;
        head = 0;
        rear = 0;
        values = new T[size];
    }

    static int Incr(int index, int size)
    {
        return (index + 1) % size;
    }

    private void UnsafeEnsureQueueNotEmpty()
    {
        if (count == 0)
            throw new Exception("Empty queue");
    }

    public int Size { get { return size; } }
    public object SyncRoot { get { return locker; } }

    #region Count

    public int Count { get { return UnsafeCount; } }
    public int SafeCount { get { lock (locker) { return UnsafeCount; } } }
    public int UnsafeCount { get { return count; } }

    #endregion

    #region Enqueue

    public void Enqueue(T obj)
    {
        UnsafeEnqueue(obj);
    }

    public void SafeEnqueue(T obj)
    {
        lock (locker) { UnsafeEnqueue(obj); }
    }

    public void UnsafeEnqueue(T obj)
    {
        values[rear] = obj;

        if (Count == Size)
            head = Incr(head, Size);
        rear = Incr(rear, Size);
        count = Math.Min(count + 1, Size);
    }

    #endregion

    #region Dequeue

    public T Dequeue()
    {
        return UnsafeDequeue();
    }

    public T SafeDequeue()
    {
        lock (locker) { return UnsafeDequeue(); }
    }

    public T UnsafeDequeue()
    {
        UnsafeEnsureQueueNotEmpty();

        T res = values[head];
        values[head] = default(T);
        head = Incr(head, Size);
        count--;

        return res;
    }

    #endregion

    #region Peek

    public T Peek()
    {
        return UnsafePeek();
    }

    public T SafePeek()
    {
        lock (locker) { return UnsafePeek(); }
    }

    public T UnsafePeek()
    {
        UnsafeEnsureQueueNotEmpty();

        return values[head];
    }

    #endregion


    #region GetEnumerator

    public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return UnsafeGetEnumerator();
    }

    public IEnumerator<T> SafeGetEnumerator()
    {
        lock (locker)
        {
            List<T> res = new List<T>(count);
            var enumerator = UnsafeGetEnumerator();
            while (enumerator.MoveNext())
                res.Add(enumerator.Current);
            return res.GetEnumerator();
        }
    }

    public IEnumerator<T> UnsafeGetEnumerator()
    {
        int index = head;
        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
        {
            yield return values[index];
            index = Incr(index, size);
        }
    }

    System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return this.GetEnumerator();
    }

    #endregion
}

I like to use the Foo()/SafeFoo()/UnsafeFoo() convention:

  • Foo methods call UnsafeFoo as a default.
  • UnsafeFoo methods modify state freely without a lock, they should only call other unsafe methods.
  • SafeFoo methods call UnsafeFoo methods inside a lock.

Its a little verbose, but it makes obvious errors, like calling unsafe methods outside a lock in a method which is supposed to be thread-safe, more apparent.

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