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How do I change the height of a textbox ?

Neither of the below work:

this.TextBox1.Size = new System.Drawing.Size(173, 100);

or

this.TextBox1.Size.Height = 100;

I wanted to be able to change the single line text box height to fit a font size on it without using multi-line if possible.

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Are you on postback? Did you try my answer? – KaeL May 2 '11 at 2:59
    
@KaeL early was not able to check it so I didn't replied to yours at the time, but I already tried and replied it. – Guapo May 2 '11 at 3:02

14 Answers 14

up vote 25 down vote accepted

There are two ways to do this :

  • Set the textbox's "multiline" property to true, in this case you don't want to do it so;
  • Set a bigger font size to the textbox

I believe it is the only ways to do it; the bigger font size should automatically fit with the textbox

share|improve this answer
    
I did try setting the font size to 36 and the textbox did not grow to display it at all. – Guapo May 2 '11 at 2:56
    
@Guapo what code do you use to set that font? Could you copy it here? – MrRoy May 2 '11 at 3:10
1  
TextBox1.Font = new System.Drawing.Font("Microsoft Sans Serif", 36F, System.Drawing.FontStyle.Bold, System.Drawing.GraphicsUnit.Point, ((byte)(0))); I ended up using the multi-box anyway but thanks. – Guapo May 2 '11 at 19:46
4  
Why is this marked as the correct answer? Adam's answer of setting AutoSize = false and then set dimensions is the correct answer. – sǝɯɐſ Jan 13 '14 at 15:40

Go into yourForm.Designer.cs Scroll down to your textbox. Example below is for textBox2 object. Add this

this.textBox2.AutoSize = false;

and set its size to whatever you want

this.textBox2.Size = new System.Drawing.Size(142, 27);

Will work like a charm - without setting multiline to true, but only until you change any option in designer itself (you will have to set these 2 lines again). I think, this method is still better than multilining. I had a textbox for nickname in my app and with multiline, people sometimes accidentially wrote their names twice, like Thomas\nThomas (you saw only one in actual textbox line). With this solution, text is simply hiding to the left after each char too long for width, so its much safer for users, to put inputs.

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3  
This should be marked as the correct answer. – sǝɯɐſ Jan 13 '14 at 15:41
4  
No, because A/ it doesn't work if the textbox is docked B/ As pointed out, changing it in the designer breaks the fix – smirkingman Apr 28 '14 at 9:11
2  
this is the correct answer +1 – Liran Sep 8 '14 at 8:34
1  
Changing the Designer file manually is generally not a good fix to anything. Almost always ends up getting clobbered later. – Tom Bogle Feb 2 '15 at 16:14

You can set the MinimumSize and/or the MaximumSize properties of the textbox. This does not affect the size immediately, but when you resize the textbox horizontally in the forms designer, the height will automatically be adjusted to satisfy the minimum/maximum size constraints. This works even when Multiline is set to false and does not depend on the font size.

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1  
I know, it's a late answer, but I just found this trick now. – Olivier Jacot-Descombes Feb 28 '13 at 15:33
2  
In my opinion this is the best method to resize the textbox so far. – Ashton Woods Jul 3 '14 at 6:50
    
I've found a quirk with this method - when placed inside of a container such as a cell of a TableLayoutPanel and you give it a Left-Right anchor, it doesn't vertically center correctly. Its vertical position seems to be calculated as though it were at its normal size. – p0lar_bear Jan 21 '15 at 16:09
    
@p0lar_bear: You could place the textbox on a panel with the right size as a workaround, and place this panel in the TableLayoutPanel cell. – Olivier Jacot-Descombes Jan 21 '15 at 17:01
    
@OlivierJacot-Descombes: True. It's my opinion, though, that if you're going to do something potentially messy like that, it'd be more manageable to just make it a multiline TextBox and suppress the Enter key, as suggested elsewhere on this page (though I know it's not what the OP was looking for - it works for me). – p0lar_bear Jan 21 '15 at 19:09

set the minimum size property

tb_01.MinimumSize = new Size(500, 300);

This is working for me.

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public partial class MyTextBox : TextBox
{
    [DefaultValue(false)]
    [Browsable(true)]
    public override bool AutoSize
    {
        get
        {
            return base.AutoSize;
        }
        set
        {
            base.AutoSize = value;
        }
    }

    public MyTextBox()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        this.AutoSize = false;
    }
share|improve this answer

Try the following :)

        textBox1.Multiline = true;
        textBox1.Height = 100;
        textBox1.Width = 173;
share|improve this answer

AutoSize, Minimum, Maximum does not give flexibility. Use multiline and handle the enter key event and suppress the keypress. Works great.

textBox1.Multiline = true;

 private void textBox1_KeyDown(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
        {
            if (e.KeyCode == Keys.Enter)
            {
                e.Handled = true;
                e.SuppressKeyPress = true;
            }
        }
share|improve this answer
    
The text will still wrap automatically if the user enters too much text, so overriding enter isn't sufficient. Setting Multiline to true is definitely NOT the answer to this question no matter how many people post it as the correct solution. (If you actually want a multiline text box, it's a great solution.) – Tom Bogle Feb 2 '15 at 16:18

Just found a great little trick to setting a custom height to a textbox.

In the designer view, set the minimumSize to whatever you desire, and then completely remove the size setting. This will cause the designer to update with the new minimum settings!

share|improve this answer
    
Works momentarily in the Designer, but as soon as it saves, it goes back to the previous height. – Tom Bogle Feb 2 '15 at 16:12
    
Darn then! It was probably a bug they fixed. Though, if you want a larger textbox just alter the text size. – Johnathan Brown Apr 15 '15 at 15:24

May be it´s a little late. But you can do this.

txtFoo.Multiline = true;
txtFoo.MinimumSize = new Size(someWith,someHeight);

I solved it that way.

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for me, the best approach is remove border of the textbox, and place it inside a Panel, which can be customized as you like.

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But it doesn't solve the problem. It makes the border look right, but the text still gets clipped at larger font sizes. – Tom Bogle Feb 2 '15 at 16:16

The following code added in your constructor after calling InitializeComponent() will make it possible to programmatically set your text box to the correct height without a) changing the Multiline property, b) having to hardcode a height, or c) mucking with the Designer-generated code. It still isn't necessarily as clean or nice as doing it in a custom control, but it's fairly simple and robust:

if (txtbox.BorderStyle == BorderStyle.None)
{
    txtbox.BorderStyle = BorderStyle.FixedSingle;
    var heightWithBorder = txtbox.ClientRectangle.Height;
    txtbox.BorderStyle = BorderStyle.None;
    txtbox.AutoSize = false;
    txtbox.Height = heightWithBorder;
}

I decided to make it cleaner and easier to use by putting it in a static class and make it an extension method on TextBox:

public static class TextBoxExtensions
{
    public static void CorrectHeight(this TextBox txtbox)
    {
        if (txtbox.BorderStyle == BorderStyle.None)
        {
            txtbox.BorderStyle = BorderStyle.FixedSingle;
            var heightWithBorder = txtbox.ClientRectangle.Height;
            txtbox.BorderStyle = BorderStyle.None;
            txtbox.AutoSize = false;
            txtbox.Height = heightWithBorder;
        }
    }
}
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You can put it inside a panel that has the same back color with your desired height. This way has this advantage that the text box can center horizontally, which is not provided by other solutions.

You can make it even more natural by using the following methods

    private void textBox1_Enter(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {

        panelTextBox.BorderStyle = BorderStyle.FixedSingle;
    }

    private void textBox1_Leave(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        panelTextBox.BorderStyle = BorderStyle.None;
    }
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I think this should work.

TextBox1.Height = 100;
share|improve this answer
3  
I just tried that and the height still doesn't change. – Guapo May 2 '11 at 3:01

I know this is a kind of old post, but I found myself in this same issue, and by investigating a bit I found out that the Height of a WinForms TextBox is actually calculated depending on the size of the font it contains, it's just not quite equal to it.

This guy explains how the calculation is done, and how you can set it on your TextBox to get the desired Height.

Cheers!

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