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I have a method that receives an Object and does something based on what type of object it detects:

void receive(Object object) {
    if (object instanceof ObjectTypeA) {
        doSomethingA();
    }
    else {
        if (object instanceof ObjectTypeB) {
            doSomethingB();
        }
        else {
            if (object instanceof ObjectTypeC) {
                doSomethingC();
            }
            else {
                if (object instanceof ObjectTypeD) {
                    doSomethingD();
                }
                else {
                    // etc...
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

How can I reduce the Cyclomatic Complexity? I searched around but couldn't find anything too useful. I'm still a novice at Java. Thank you.

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6  
Why not overload the method? Those references to instanceof always make me shudder. –  Andrew Thompson May 2 '11 at 4:16
    
@Andrew - That should have been an answer. It would have been the right one. –  Justin Morgan May 4 '11 at 13:38
    
@Justin: "It would have been the right one." I doubt the OP would have thought so, though I am not impressed with their choice of 'correct answer'. ;) –  Andrew Thompson May 4 '11 at 14:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Can't you leverage an object-oriented approach for this? Create an interface that has the doSomething() method then create subclasses that implement the desired behavior? Then calling object.doSomething() would execute the appropriate behavior?

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2  
This would work, but if this only to reduce cyclomatic complexity this is bad. From the exemple it seem that this is the callback of a listener. Typically and object doesn't contains one method as per possible listener specific usage. –  Nicolas Bousquet May 2 '11 at 8:36
1  
I wasn't approaching it from a cyclomatic complexity perspective, so in that sense I didn't answer the question. However when I see many conditionals all using instanceof I think polymorphism should seriously be considered, if for nothing else then to create more maintainable code. That's what cyclomatic complexity measurements are meant to assist with anyway. –  laz May 2 '11 at 13:02
1  
Well think about any external library for exemple. You have a case depending of the type of whatever class hierarchy you use (like widget type in SWING). This would be very bad pratice to modify the external library for this. And the external library can't know in advence all the things anybody will ever do with it. So it define generic listener and you can check event or originator type. Even if this your own code, seperation of concern principe will make you avoid adding too much unrelated methods on objects just for the matter of removing a harmless switch statement. –  Nicolas Bousquet May 2 '11 at 13:15
    
reducing cyclomatic complexity reduces bugs. scientific fact: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… –  davidjnelson Mar 31 '12 at 23:45
2  
@devadvocate : Is that so - Read the second paragraph : "However, studies that control for program size (...) are generally less conclusive, with many finding no significant correlation....." –  mattnz Jun 14 '12 at 22:36

Cyclomatic complexity is a measure based on graph structure of the code. Specifically, it is based on the number of possible paths through the code; see here for more details. While there is a correlation between CC and what a typical programmer would view as code complexity, they are not the same thing. For instance:

  • CC takes no account of the semantics of the code; e.g. what such-and-such method that is being called does, or the mathematical properties of an algorithm.

  • CC takes no account of design and coding patterns. So, something that CC says is complex may well be simple to someone who understands the pattern being used.

You could say that the relationship between CC and real code complexity is like the relationship between IQ and real intelligence.

Thus, Cyclomatic Complexity should be treated as an indicator of where the complex parts of your code is ... not as a true measure of complexity, or of code quality. Indeed, highly complex code is not necessarily poor quality. Often, the complexity is inherent, and trying to get rid of it only makes matters worse.


In this particular example, the high CC measure does not correspond to something that would cause a typical programmer any difficulties. The best answer (IMO) is to leave the method alone. Chalk it up as a false positive.

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I agree with your general definition for CC. However, I partially disagree with your specific answer for this question. The code is indeed easy to read for an average programmer. However, using an interface as stated by laz, would clean up the code. You wouldn't be able to see what's happening with one look. But that's typical for refactoring large methods into smaller ones. –  Torsten Jul 22 '13 at 9:23
    
@Torsten - You misunderstand what I'm saying. I'm not saying that you can't reduce the CC here. This example should not cause a programmer of average ability any problems, no matter what the CC is saying. And since the real goal is to make the code readable, no change is warranted. "Cleaning up the code" is only worth doing if there are readability issues. –  Stephen C Sep 30 '13 at 7:58
void receive(ObjectTypeA object) {
        doSomethingA();
}

void receive(ObjectTypeB object) {
        doSomethingB();
}

void receive(ObjectTypeC object) {
        doSomethingC();
}

...

// Your final 'else' method
void receive(Object object) {
        doSomethingZ();
}
share|improve this answer

Never had a goal to "reduce the cyclomatic complexity", though there were times when I was paid by LOC.

You code is "good enough". My eyes stumble on brackets, so I'd sacrifice a bit of performance and did the following (providing types A, B and so on are not in the same hierarchy):

receive(Object object) {
    if (object intanceof ObjectTypeA) doSomethingA();
    if (object instanceof ObjectTypeB) doSomethingB();
    ...

or (if they are in the same hierarchy):

receive(Object object) {
    if (object intanceof ObjectTypeA) { doSomethingA(); return; }
    if (object instanceof ObjectTypeB) { doSomethingB(); return; }
    ...

Don't know if it would reduce the cyclomatic thingy, and couldn't care less.

share|improve this answer
    
reducing cyclomatic complexity reduces bugs. scientific fact: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… Also, if you want to see how code quality affects the bottom line of a business, check this out: ibm.com/developerworks/rational/library/4995.html –  davidjnelson Mar 31 '12 at 23:45
1  
Science by your link is, as they themselves say, "inconclusive". –  Vladimir Dyuzhev Apr 4 '12 at 15:36

Why the need to reduce the complexity? It is a simple enough pattern that any competent developer would see it as a trivial function.

I would probably write it this way

    if (object instanceof ObjectTypeA) 
    {
        doSomethingA();
    }
    else if (object instanceof ObjectTypeB) 
    {
        doSomethingB();
    }
    else if (object instanceof ObjectTypeC) 
    {
        doSomethingC();
    }

If it is to to meet some esoteric need to "CC must be less than x", then the overarching rule that the standards are there to ensure maintainable code would mean this is acceptable no matter how high the CC gets.

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1  
It will be difficult to write the unit test cases if the code is written this way. One more data type you add will result in one more step in the ladder to be added and one more test. OO allows abstraction to take care of this, if your approach is to be taken it is better we write in C instead of Java. –  Vinod R May 2 '11 at 5:51
    
Vinod R, OOP added a new choice, using polymorphism. This is not to say this is always the best solution. When the possible methods are fixed (and small), and the subtypes can vary a lot, using OOP and polymorphism is a good solution. But if on the contrary, your set of subtypes is limited but the possible thing you want to do with them is unbounded, a "switch case" approach is better. In this language with pattern matching are the best, not specially OOP ones. We could benefit from an enum through. As of unit tests, whatever the solution the number of case to test remain the same. –  Nicolas Bousquet May 2 '11 at 8:27
    
Vinof R - Agreed, In some cases the pure OO solution, while preferable, is not possible. The question did not contain enough information to indicate a pure OO solution would be useable. Closing the switch/case with an else/default, allows the detection of unimplemented cases. –  mattnz May 2 '11 at 21:46
1  
I think this would be ideal for code review. codereview.stackexchange.com –  Wes May 4 '11 at 8:53
    
this might be acceptable in a prototype where no one else never had to read the code, and bugs were acceptable. otherwise, use polymorphism. –  davidjnelson Mar 31 '12 at 23:38

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