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I have a filehandle FILE in Perl, and I want to iterate over all the lines in the file. Is there a difference between the following?

while (<FILE>) {
    # do something
}

and

foreach (<FILE>) {
    # do something
}
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8 Answers 8

up vote 32 down vote accepted

For most purposes, you probably won't notice a difference. However, foreach reads each line into a list (not an array) before going through it line by line, whereas while reads one line at a time. As foreach will use more memory and require processing time upfront, it is generally recommended to use while to iterate through lines of a file.

EDIT (via Schwern): The foreach loop is equivalent to this:

my @lines = <$fh>;
for my $line (@lines) {
    ...
}

It's unfortunate that Perl doesn't optimize this special case as it does with the range operator (1..10).

For example, if I read /usr/share/dict/words with a for loop and a while loop and have them sleep when they're done I can use ps to see how much memory the process is consuming. As a control I've included a program that opens the file but does nothing with it.

USER       PID %CPU %MEM      VSZ    RSS   TT  STAT STARTED      TIME COMMAND
schwern  73019   0.0  1.6   625552  33688 s000  S     2:47PM   0:00.24 perl -wle open my $fh, shift; for(<$fh>) { 1 } print "Done";  sleep 999 /usr/share/dict/words
schwern  73018   0.0  0.1   601096   1236 s000  S     2:46PM   0:00.09 perl -wle open my $fh, shift; while(<$fh>) { 1 } print "Done";  sleep 999 /usr/share/dict/words
schwern  73081   0.0  0.1   601096   1168 s000  S     2:55PM   0:00.00 perl -wle open my $fh, shift; print "Done";  sleep 999 /usr/share/dict/words

The for program is consuming almost 32 megs of real memory (the RSS column) to store the contents of my 2.4 meg /usr/share/dict/words. The while loop only stores one line at a time consuming just 70k for line buffering.

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Nothing "fake" about the list. List is correct, array is wrong. There's no array there. –  ysth Feb 25 '09 at 15:50
    
The distinction between arrays and lists is important. Conflating them will lead to errors in your understanding and eventually your code. –  daotoad Feb 25 '09 at 16:16
2  
-1 until you mention that while (<FILE>) {} tramples on $_ while foreach does not (foreach localises $_ first). Surely this is the most important behavioural difference! –  j_random_hacker Feb 26 '09 at 15:41
3  
@j_random_hacker The memory difference is far more important and practical. You shouldn't be relying on $_ for any significant distance of code anyway exactly because lots of things trample on it. –  Schwern Feb 26 '09 at 23:02
1  
There is another implication to foreach using lists. If the filehandle is a pipe that holds the output of another program, foreach will wait until the pipe is closed because only then will it be sure it read all the lines into the array, while the while will only block until a \n (or more accurately, an input record separator character) is sent over the pipe. Using a while allows you to process the output of one program before it finishes running. –  Nathan Fellman Jul 15 '11 at 11:47

foreach loop is faster than while (which is conditional based).

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A foreach is also conditional based. Its condition is that it's done working on the list. –  Nathan Fellman Jul 15 '11 at 11:48

Here is an example where foreach will not work but while will do the job

while (<FILE>) {
   $line1 = $_;
   if ($line1 =~ /SOMETHING/) {
      $line2 = <FILE>;
      if (line2 =~ /SOMETHING ELSE/) {
         print "I found SOMETHING and SOMETHING ELSE in consecutive lines\n";
         exit();
      }
   }
}

You simply cannot do this with foreach because it will read the whole file into a list before entering the loop and you wont be able to read the next line inside the loop. I am sure there will be workarounds to this problem even in foreach (reading into an array comes to mind) but while definitely offers a very straight forward solution.

A second example is when you have to parse a large (say 3GB) file on your machine with only 2GB RAM. foreach will simply run out of memory and crash. I learnt this the hard way very early in my perl programming life.

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In addition to the previous responses, another benefit of using while is that you can use the $. variable. This is the current line number of the last filehandle accessed (see perldoc perlvar).

while ( my $line = <FILE> ) {
    if ( $line =~ /some_target/ ) {
        print "Found some_target at line $.\n";
    }
}
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Re "accessed", specifically, via: readline/glob (aka <>), eof, tell, sysseek. –  ysth Feb 25 '09 at 16:02
    
Strictly speaking, you can also access the $. variable using a for loop; but since it expands the list entirely first, you always get the last line number. –  brunov Mar 9 '09 at 9:34

Update: j random hacker points out in a comment that Perl special cases the falseness test in a while loop when reading from a file handle. I've just verified that reading a false value will not terminate the loop -- at least on modern perls. Sorry for steering you all wrong. After 15 years of writing Perl I'm still a noob. ;)

Everyone above is right: use the while loop because it will be more memory efficient and give you more control.

A funny thing about that while loop though is that it exits when the read is false. Usually that will be end-of-file, but what if it returns an empty string or a 0? Oops! Your program just exited too soon. This can happen on any file handle if the last line in the file doesn't have a newline. It can also happen with custom file objects that have a read method that doesn't treat newlines the same way as regular Perl file objects.

Here's how to fix it. Check for an undefined value read which indicates end-of-file:

while (defined(my $line = <FILE>)) {
    print $line;
}

The foreach loop doesn't have this problem by the way and is correct even though inefficient.

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2  
No! Perl special-cases the form "while (<FILE>) { ... }" to be exactly what you suggested as it's replacement: "while (defined($_ = <FILE>)) {}". So a line at the end of file containing only "0" and no LF character will not be ignored. See the section "I/O Operators" in perlop. –  j_random_hacker Feb 26 '09 at 16:14
    
Sweet! When did this get fixed? There are still many examples in the pod that use the while defined syntax. IIRC Perl used to treat while(<>) differently than while(<FILE>). –  Ken Fox Feb 27 '09 at 15:22
2  
AFAIK it's been that way since Perl 5, but I don't know. And Perl's picky about what forms it will special-case: e.g. "while (<>)", "while ($_ = <FILE>)" and "while (my $x = <FILE>)" get special-cased, but "while ($_ = '' . <FILE>)" doesn't. (Test with a file ending with a "0" and no LF.) –  j_random_hacker Feb 28 '09 at 14:14
    
Don't worry about feeling like a noob... I've been Perling since 1999 and a month ago learned that the range operator is special-cased for two constant scalars! (E.g. "1 .. 10") :) Yes it sucks that some of the POD docs are so out of date, also googling turns up some bad advice/explanations. –  j_random_hacker Feb 28 '09 at 14:19
    
I dropped the -1 I gave you but you can still get another +1 from me if you mention that "while (<FILE>)" tramples on $_ while "foreach (<FILE>)" localises $_, avoiding tramplification. This non-obvious difference in behaviour causes quite a few subtle bugs. –  j_random_hacker Feb 28 '09 at 14:21

I added an example dealing with this to the next edition of Effective Perl Programming.

With a while, you can stop processing FILE and still get the unprocessed lines:

 while( <FILE> ) {  # scalar context
      last if ...;
      }
 my $line = <FILE>; # still lines left

If you use a foreach, you consume all of the lines in the foreach even if you stop processing them:

 foreach( <FILE> ) { # list context
      last if ...;
      }
 my $line = <FILE>; # no lines left!
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*j_random_hacker* mentioned this in the comments to this answer, but didn't actually put it in an answer of its own, even though it's another difference worth mentioning.

The difference is that while (<FILE>) {} overwrites $_, while foreach(<FILE>) {} localizes it. That is:

$_ = 100;
while (<FILE>) {
    # $_ gets each line in turn
    # do something with the file
}
print $_; # yes I know that $_ is unneeded here, but 
          # I'm trying to write clear code for the example

Will print out the last line of <FILE>.

However,

$_ = 100;
foreach(<FILE>) {
    # $_ gets each line in turn
    # do something with the file
}
print $_;

Will print out 100. To get the same with a while(<FILE>) {} construct you'd need to do:

$_ = 100;
{
    local $_;
    while (<FILE>) {
        # $_ gets each line in turn
        # do something with the file
    }
}
print $_; # yes I know that $_ is unneeded here, but 
          # I'm trying to write clear code for the example

Now this will print 100.

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In scalar context (i.e. while) <FILE> returns each line in turn.

In list context (i.e. foreach) <FILE> returns a list consisting of each line from the file.

You should use the while construct.

See perlop - I/O Operators for more.

Edit: j_random_hacker rightly says that

while (<FILE>) { … }

tramples on $_ while foreach does not (foreach localises $_ first). Surely this is the most important behavioural difference!

share|improve this answer
    
-1 until you mention that while (<FILE>) {} tramples on $_ while foreach does not (foreach localises $_ first). Surely this is the most important behavioural difference! –  j_random_hacker Feb 26 '09 at 15:42
    
Thank you! This unintuitive difference is the source of quite a few bugs. –  j_random_hacker Feb 26 '09 at 16:16
    
@j_random_hacker can you elaborate on what you mean by while loop "tramples" on $_ whereas foreach localizes $_? and the caveats I should be aware of? I am a perl beginner, and am trying to get the fundamentals down... –  Alby Apr 19 '12 at 4:14
1  
@Alby: After the code $_ = 42; foreach (@some_list) { ... }, $_ is 42, because Perl auto-localises $_ in this situation. But after $_ = 42; while (<FILE>) { ... }, $_ is whatever the last line read from FILE was (which will be undef in the usual case where the entire file was read). It's annoying, because the foreach behaviour is much safer/better for maintenance, but using foreach to read a file means reading the entire file into memory first which is very wasteful of memory if you have a large file and line-by-line processing would suffice! –  j_random_hacker Apr 22 '12 at 4:25
    
Thank you very much. It totally makes sense. It would've been nice if there is an looping mechanism to read the filehandler line by line and still localizes $_. –  Alby Apr 22 '12 at 17:42

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