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interface Foo { 

}
class Beta implements Foo { 

}
public class Main extends Beta{
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Beta x = new Beta();
        Foo f= (Main)x;
        }
}

output java.lang.ClassCastException. Why it is happening please xplain?

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7 Answers 7

This happens because Main is a subclass of Beta. So if you have an instance of Beta (the x variable) you cannot cast it to Main. You can do the casting the other way round: if you have an instance of Main you can cast it to Beta because Main contains all the methods of Beta.

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No. A Main is already a Beta and needs no casting at all. Similarly, Beta x is already a Foo and needs no casting as well. –  user unknown May 2 '11 at 10:47
1  
@user unknown Although Main is already a Beta, what is created is a new Beta (and not a Main) which you can't cast down. –  Thomas May 2 '11 at 11:01
    
Yes, but you oversee, that you never cast down. Foo f = x; needs no casting, because every Beta implements Foo. And you wouldn't cast Main to Beta, because every Main is already a Beta. –  user unknown May 2 '11 at 11:38
    
@user unknown: This step is not optimised out. First x is cast to Beta and only then assigned. And that casting step cannot be done. That casting is actually a runtime operation involving type checks, not just a hint for the compiler. –  viraptor May 2 '11 at 12:00
    
There is a constructor call to Beta, and an assignment to x, which is declared as a Beta. I don't see a casting so far. A casting is tried in the next line to Main, which will fail, since x has never been a Main. The assignment to f, which is declared as Foo, needs no casting too. I don't know what mrig is trying to achieve with the sidestep to (Main)x, but you nearly never need to cast a Main to Beta, since it is always a Beta. Thomas found a case in his comment to Overbose, when trying to invoke an overloaded method. –  user unknown May 2 '11 at 12:28

With a slight change, your code would work :

interface Foo { 

}
class Beta implements Foo { 

}
public class Main extends Beta{
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Beta x = new Beta();
        Foo f = x; // Cast to main removed --> works
        }
}

But this change to make the code work is obviously not enough to get a thorough understanding of why the original code doesn't work, so I'll try and explain a bit inheritance logic and the use of casts in java :

First, your code can be described with the following inheritance/implementation "diagram" :

Foo
 ^
 | (implements)
Beta
 ^
 |  extends
Main

Given these relationships, the following statements are correct :

  • An instance of Beta can be assigned to a variable of (interface) type Foo

  • An instance of Main can be assigned to a variable of (class) type Beta or a variable of (interface) type Foo

And... That's about it. So the following statement is incorrect :

  • An instance of Beta can be assigned to of variable of (class) type Main

Simply because class Beta has no knowledge of the existence of class Main, as Beta is upper in the inheritance hierachy : this is the general inheritance contract in OO programming.

Hence you ClassCastException.

Try playing with the instanceof operator and the boolean isAssignableFrom(Class<?> cls) Class instance method (something like this :)

interface Foo {

}

class Beta implements Foo {

}

public class Main extends Beta {
  public static void main(String[] args) {

    // Let's create some instances of Main and Beta :
    Beta b = new Beta();
    Main m = new Main();

    // Let's test those newly created instances :
    System.out.println("is m an instance of Foo ? : " + (m instanceof Foo)); // output true
    System.out.println("is b an instance of Foo ? : " + (b instanceof Foo)); // output true
    System.out.println("is m an instance of Beta ? : " + (m instanceof Beta)); // output true
    System.out.println("is b an instance of Beta ? : " + (b instanceof Beta)); // output true (obviously !)
    System.out.println("is m an instance of Main ? : " + (m instanceof Main)); // output true (obviously !)
    System.out.println("is b an instance of Main ? : " + (b instanceof Main)); // output FALSE !

    // Explanations with the isAssignableFrom() method :
    // Obvious !
    System.out.println("is a variable of type Foo assignable a from a Foo instance ? : "
        + Foo.class.isAssignableFrom(Foo.class)); // output true
    System.out.println("is a variable of type Main assignable from a Main instance ? : "
        + Main.class.isAssignableFrom(Main.class)); // output true
    System.out.println("is a variable of type Beta assignable from a Beta instance ? : "
        + Beta.class.isAssignableFrom(Beta.class)); // output true

    // Now the real thing :
    System.out.println("is a variable of type Foo assignable from a Beta instance ? : "
        + Foo.class.isAssignableFrom(Beta.class)); // output true
    System.out.println("is a variable of type Foo assignable from a Main instance ? : "
        + Foo.class.isAssignableFrom(Main.class)); // output true
    System.out.println("is Main assignable from Beta ? : " + Main.class.isAssignableFrom(Beta.class)); // output false
    System.out.println("is Main assignable from Foo ? : " + Main.class.isAssignableFrom(Foo.class)); // output false
    System.out.println("is Beta assignable from Main ? : " + Beta.class.isAssignableFrom(Main.class)); // output true
    System.out.println("is Beta assignable from Foo ? : " + Beta.class.isAssignableFrom(Foo.class)); // output false

    // Thus the following will work (for example):

    // direct assignation to interface variables (NO CAST is necessary) :
    Foo fb = b;
    Foo fm = m;

    // Some tests :
    System.out.println("is fm an instance of Main ? : " + (fb instanceof Main)); // output true
    System.out.println("is fb an instance of Beta ? : " + (b instanceof Beta)); // output true

    // getting up the hierarchy of main step by step (NO CAST is necessary) :
    Beta bm = m;
    Foo fbm = bm;

    System.out.println("is bm an instance of Main ? : " + (fb instanceof Beta)); // output true
    System.out.println("is fbm an instance of Main ? : " + (b instanceof Main)); // output true

  }
}

So, Why do you need to use cast you have to cast anyway ? Only when you know a specific supertype variable contains an instance of a specific subtype. Let's add a few more lines these line to our main method to illustrate this :

Object o = m; // m is an instance of Main, but also of java.lang.Object

Foo f2 = (Foo)o; // wont'compile without casting !
Beta b2 = (Beta)o; // wont'compile without casting !
Main m2 = (Main)o;

//And... finally :

Beta b3 = m;

Main m3 = (Main)b3; // won't compile without casting !
// Got it ;) ?

It is often better - IMHO - to design your program so that your reduce casting at minimum (and always check with instanceof or isAssignableFrom() before doing so).

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You got it wrong, too. First, you say it is correct: "An instance of Main can be assigned to of variable of (class) type Beta", then, the very same sentence shall be incorrect. Every Main is a Beta an can be assigned to a Beta, and: without casting. –  user unknown May 2 '11 at 11:42
    
thanks for the comment, that was a huge, huge, error inducing typo... –  Erwan Queffélec May 2 '11 at 11:54
    
Thorough explanation, nice job! –  Ogre Psalm33 Mar 12 '13 at 14:57

In contrast to what others have said, it is correct to cast from a class to own of its sub classes. In fact that is the only valid and useful use case of casts in Java. A cast (T)e checks at runtime whether it is valid to a treat an object as an object of some type T. And in your program this is not valid, because x refers to an object of type Beta which is not of type Main.

So this is totally expected behavior.

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You're right about casts on references. Yet what we're talking about here is the class of the object. You can't cast an object to a subclass of that object's class. –  Thomas May 2 '11 at 11:06

Because you can't cast Beta to Main. You can't cast a base class to a derived one.

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A subclass is already of type superclass, and needs no casting at all. Object o = new String ("no casting involved"); In fact, you can only cast the other way round, but you cannot cast every Object to String - just Objects which happen to be Strings. –  user unknown May 2 '11 at 10:53
    
@user unknown: in certain case you should cast a subclass to a superclass type if you want to explicitly use a method of the base class that has been overrided in the subclass. –  Heisenbug May 2 '11 at 11:09
    
You can't. It's overriden. Show us the code. –  user unknown May 2 '11 at 11:34
    
@user unknown Suppose you have methods foo(Bar b) and foo(Baz b) with class Bar extends Baz, you might have to call foo((Baz)bar); in order to call the second method instead of the first one. - I admit that Overbose put it slightly wrong: you can't override a method and change the parameter types. That would not be overriding but overloading. –  Thomas May 2 '11 at 12:09
    
Yes, that's overloading. –  user unknown May 2 '11 at 12:17

You cannot cast base class to derived class. If you want to make Foo instance with Main class type, you can use like below:

interface Foo { }
class Beta implements Foo { }

public class Main extends Beta {

    public static void main (String[] args) {
         Foo x = new Main(); 
    }
}
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Please have a look at the code- and posting formatting guidelines. Use the preview below your edit-field to control what you're doing. Have a nice time. :) –  user unknown May 2 '11 at 10:44
    
thanks dude.. Will follow it –  developer May 10 '11 at 8:24

As Darin already said, you can't cast objects of a superclass to a subclass. I think what you really want to do is this: Foo f= x; (since Beta implements Foo no cast is necessary at all).

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As Darin is false, so are you. Of course you can cast a superclass to a subclass; you just can't cast a superclass to every subclass. The reference has to point to a type of that specific subclass. –  user unknown May 2 '11 at 10:56
    
@user unknown If the referenced object is already of that type of subclass and just the reference itself is a superclass, then you can cast. But you can't cast an object of the superclass to a subclass. We're not talking about casts in general but of casting a Beta object to Main (note that actually the object is Beta and not just the reference to it). –  Thomas May 2 '11 at 11:00
    
Well, a reference is a reference. If the referenced is just a reference to an object of the superclass, then you can't cast it to the derived class (but you can try). But the casting direction is always from the supertype to the derived type. In the other direction, every Main is a Beta and needs no casting. –  user unknown May 2 '11 at 11:51
    
@user unknown To put it short: You can't cast objects of one class to subclasses of that class. Whatever you do to references doesn't matter here, since the checks are always done on the objects. I updated the answer accordingly. –  Thomas May 2 '11 at 12:02

You can Cast an object to a subclass only if the object being casted is actually an instance on this subclass.

So if you have something like this:

Beta x = new Main();

then the above casting will work, since "new Main()" will give you an instance of Main.

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