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I want to complete my iPad application.

My app fetches a record from a server which situated in single lan within my company campus using wifi lan connection configuration. So, apps cannot read data from over internet.

I don't have an Apple ID (99$) because it is not necessary for my apps, as they are only run within my company.

So how I can run my application on an iPad? It runs fine in the simulator.

I don't understand how to start deployment and which files are used to run apps in iPad.

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You need to enroll in Apple's developer program ($99) to be able to deploy on iPad. (There's no way around this.) Once you have you will find a step by step guide in the iOS provisioning portal.

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As Erik suggested you can't deploy on a device until you acquire a developer license from Apple. Since you aim to distribute your app within your company itself, I would recommend you to acquire an enterprise license($299), rather than a $99 standard one.

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1  
Getting the enterprise license is only worth while if it's a big company. If there's only a handful of users I would save the money and use the standard license. For reference: You can use up to 100 devices with a standard license, but you'll had to add them manually one by one and you need to update the provisioning profile every 3(?) months. – Erik B May 2 '11 at 13:03
    
Erik I suggested an enterprise license as vipul says the app would be using a local LAN setup over a wi-fi(assuming some intranet web service is used). For this kind of app, wouldn't it be better to have an enterprise license? – Vin May 2 '11 at 17:03

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