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My case right now:

try:
  try:
    condition
  catch

  try:
    condition
  catch

catch
 major failure

Is it bad to have the code like that? Does it clutter too much, or what are the implications of something like that?

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I wouldn't just cut a verdict and claim "it's bad", because sometimes you may need it. Python sometimes deliberately throws exceptions instead of letting you ask (does this ...?) [the EAFP motto] and in some cases nesting of try/catch is useful - when this makes sense with the logical flow of the code.

But my guess is that most times you don't. So a better question in your case would be to present a specific use case where you think you need such code.

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I agree to this one. I use nested exceptions now and then myself, and it is not "inherently" bad. Sometimes it may even improve the readability of your code... –  sbrattla May 2 '11 at 8:07
    
Right now, it's the only way to catch some errors in the middle-statements...if any of those fail, all others become useless, and the top-statement becomes useless as well, because i need all of them fulfilled in order to fulfill the topmost statement. (I.e: Passing parameters to a class' method which will send the data to an external API [Google Contacts]). Thank you! :) –  Jorge May 2 '11 at 8:12
1  
@Jorge: If your are just testing a couple of conditions then the if/else statement would seem better suited. You may be using try/except as a hidden goto statement here. If you post more detailed code you will get more specific answers! –  Ber May 2 '11 at 9:17
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No, that's somewhat common (except the keyword is except rather than catch). It depends on what you need to do and the design.

What IS bad, that I see too much of, is catching top-level Exception class, rather than something more specific (e.g. KeyError). Or raising the same.

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Very true... it's except, not catch. My bad. I'm catching the Exception class for now, but i'll extend it later, when i have more stuff defined, so it'll probably give me a better control and this kind of structure won't be necessary. Thank you for the explanation, much appreciated. –  Jorge May 2 '11 at 8:09
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