Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i have little problem with if

{
    string nom;
    string ou;
    nom = "1";
    if (nom == "1")
    {
        nom +=1;
        ou = nom;
    }
    Console.Write(ou);
}

but i cant print ou value i dont know why

share|improve this question
1  
Not an articulate question in my opinion. Code is weird with no explanation -- why do "x += 1" on a string? –  dbkk Jun 23 '09 at 13:45
add comment

7 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Another option is to set ou in an else:

if (nom == "1")
{
    nom +=1;
    ou = nom;
} else 
{
    ou = "blank value";
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Try something like this

{
    string nom;
    string ou = String.Empty;
    nom = "1";
    if (nom == "1")
    {
        nom +=1;
        ou = nom;
    }
    Console.Write(ou);
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

C# compiler requires the variables to be definitely initialized before use.

Definite initialization is a compile-time thing, it doesn't consider runtime values of variables.

However, if the variable nom was explicitly definied as const, the compiler would be sure that it would not change at runtime and the if statement block would run and the variable ou would be definitely assigned to.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Does this even compile?

nom is a string - how can you do nom += 1?

share|improve this answer
4  
The same way string foo = "User id=" + 10; works. The result is "User id=10". Here, nom would be "11". That might not be the expected result, admittedly... –  Jon Skeet Feb 25 '09 at 10:59
    
1 will be converted to string before concatenation. it's equal to nom += 1.ToString() –  abatishchev Feb 25 '09 at 11:27
    
Well I never! I'm really surprised the compiler lets you do that... –  teedyay Feb 25 '09 at 11:50
add comment

Try replacing the second line with

string ou = null;

The problem is that if nom turns out not to equal "1", the variable ou won't have been initialized. The compiler here wants to guarantee that ou has been assigned a value.

share|improve this answer
add comment

This is because ou is unassigned outside the scope of the if block. Change the declaration line to string ou = string.Empty; and it shoudl work.

share|improve this answer
add comment

This snippet won't even compile, let alone printing ou. C# enforces all variables to be initialized before accessing, which is not always true in your case. Thus changing

string ou;

to, say:

string ou = "";

will do just fine.

share|improve this answer
    
To whoever downvoted this: what exactly don't you agree with? –  Anton Gogolev Feb 25 '09 at 13:53
    
I did not downvote it, but my issue with it is the ="", it should be = String.Empty for readability reasons mostly. –  Alex May 4 '09 at 19:54
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.