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I want to know what's difference in the following two class.

example 1:

class A
{
string name;
public:
  A(const char* _name):name(_name){}
  void print(){cout<<"A's name:"<<name<<endl;}
};

example 2:

class A
{
string name;
public:
  A(const char* _name){name(_name);}
  void print(){cout<<"A's name:"<<name<<endl;}}

why the example 1 is passed and the last one is wrong? Thanks

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6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That's just how the language is defined. The member initializers should be placed before the body of the constructor.

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In example 1 you initialize the string with the given value right away. In example 2 you create an empty string first and assign it later on.

Despite some performance differences and ignoring possible differences due to copy constructor handling etc. it's essentially the same result.

However once you use a const member you'll have to use example 1's way to do it, e.g. I usually create unique IDs the following way:

class SomeObject
{
    static unsigned int nextID = 0;
    const unsigned int ID;
    SomeObject() : ID(nextID++)
    {
        // you can't change ID here anymore due to it being const
    }
}
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good answer, just to add that example2 in the original posting is not valid C++, as Oli correctly observed below (stackoverflow.com/a/5856465/1284631) –  axeoth Jul 31 '12 at 9:13

The first example is an actual initialization. It has a number of advantages, including being the only way to set up const members, and having proper exception-safety.

The second example is not valid C++, AFAIK. If you had instead written name = name_, then this would just be normal assignment. Of course, this isn't always possible; the object might be const, or not have an assignment operator defined. This approach could also be less efficient that the first example, because the object is both default-initialized and assigned.

As for why the initializer list is before the constructor body; well, that's just the way the language has been defined.

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In the first example the member name is initialized with a ctr getting char * as parameter.

In the second case it is initialized with a default ctr at first and it gets value by the assignment operator (operator=) later. That's why it is wrong with your case that it is already constructed there so you can not use the ctr once again you could just use the assignment operator.

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The reason is that name lookup works different in initializer lists and function bodies:

class A
{
  std::string foo; // member name
public:
  A(const char* foo) // argument name
    : foo(foo) // member foo, followed by argument foo.
  {
    std::cout << foo; // argument foo.
  }
};

If the initializer list was inside the function body, there would be an ambiguity between member foo and argument foo.

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Thanks for all answer,I've got it,It's constructed before calling constructor,so couldn't initialize again,so must be assignment.Thanks –  John May 4 '11 at 2:02

The motivation behind the initialization list is due to const field holding a object by value (as opposed to reference/pointer field).

Such fields must be initialized exactly once (due to their const-ness). If C++ didn't have initialization list then a ctor would look something like:

class A {
public:
  const string s;
  const string t;

  A() {
    // Access to either s or t is not allowed - they weren't initialized
    s = "some-string";
    // now you can access s but you can't access t
    f(*this);

    t = "some other string";
    // From now you can access both ...
  }
}


void f(A& a) {
  // Can you access a.s or a.t?
  cout << a.s << a.t;
}

Without an initialization list a ctor can pass a partially-initialized object of type A to a function, and that function will have no way of knowing which fields are initialized yet. Too risky and very difficult for the compiler/linker to check.

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