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I use following Regex to validate a string ^[a-zA-Z0-9-/]*

    private static void ValidateActualValue(string value)
    {
        if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(value)) throw new ArgumentNullException("value");
        if (Regex.IsMatch(value, (@"^[a-zA-Z0-9-/]*")))
        {
            throw new InvalidBarcodeException(value);
        }
    }

The following string should be allowed string correctBarcodeString = "1-234567890/A"; However there's still an exception thrown.

Allowed values should be:

  • 1234234545689889097
  • A-adf90923409/1234
  • aaaaaaaAAA
  • BC-9876655788
  • BC-345/q3435/wqer
  • ABC-/BCD
  • etc.
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Inside a character group the - has to be at the beginning or at the end, otherwise it has to be escaped.

So change it to

"^[a-zA-Z0-9/-]*"

Edit:

I would also suggest an anchor at the end of the regex, otherwise it will also match as long as the first part is valid.

"^[a-zA-Z0-9/-]*$"

if you want to avoid matching the empty string then use + instead of *. Or if you know a valid Min/Max Range for the length use {4,20}, if the minimum amount of characters is 4 and the maximum is 20.

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this matches true for all of the above examples. –  iain May 2 '11 at 13:07

Put the - character at the end of the class or escape it.

[a-zA-Z0-9/-] or [a-zA-Z0-9\-/]

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I that that you really want;

@"^[\w/-]+"

Using a + instead of a * will also cover the empty string. \w = all numbers + letters

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1  
\w matches also underscore _ –  M42 May 2 '11 at 13:17

Change

@"^[a-zA-Z0-9-/]*"

to

@"^[a-zA-Z0-9/]*"

You have an extra hyphen after 9.

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I think he wanted '-' to count as well. –  atoMerz May 2 '11 at 13:06

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