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Please give me a hint as to what is going on here:

List<? extends Number> a = new ArrayList<Number>();
List<? extends Number> b = new ArrayList<Number>();

a.addAll(b); // ouch! compiler yells at me, see the block below:
/*
  incompatible types
  found   : java.util.List<capture#714 of ? extends java.lang.Number>
  required: java.util.List<java.lang.Number>
 */

This simple code does not compile. I vaguely remember something related to type captures, like those should be mostly used in interface specs, not the actual code, but I never got dumbfounded like that.

This of course might be fixed bruteforcefully, like that:

List<? extends Number> a = new ArrayList<Number>();
List<? extends Number> b = new ArrayList<Number>();

@SuppressWarnings({"unchecked"})
List<Number> aPlain = (List<Number>) a;
@SuppressWarnings({"unchecked"}) 
List<Number> bPlain = (List<Number>) b;

aPlain.addAll(bPlain); 

So, do I really have to either give up captures in the declaration (the capture came to me from an interface, so I'll have to change some API), or stick with type casts with suppression annotations (which generally suck and complicates code a bit)?

Thanks in advance,
Anton

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Hi, why not just declare a as List<Number> a = new ArrayList<Number>() ? –  Axel May 2 '11 at 13:22
    
Well, I have some API which declares this capture already when returning a List to me. I use a constructor just to keep things simpler while making them a bit more obscure (unintetionally). –  Anton S. Kraievoy May 2 '11 at 13:53

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You have essentially two lists of possibly different types. Because ? extends Number means a class which extends Number. So for list a it can be classA and for list b it can be for example classB. They are not compatible, they can be totally different.

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1  
You're mean... providing a comment as a decoy. I wanted to reply to that comment before answering. Now the comment is gone and you answered instead. ;) –  musiKk May 2 '11 at 13:19
    
@musiKk - Hahahaha, everything was planned;) –  Petar Minchev May 2 '11 at 13:20
    
This is somehow related to type covariance. Maybe the example itself (addAll operation) is somewhat restrictive, but my opinion is that I should be able to perform any collection operations as long as equals() and hashCode() are defined on the objects which are in the collection. UPD: And, actually, Java is also restrictive in this regard: I am unable to create a wildcard directly: new ArrayList<? extends Number>(); // ouch!.. –  Anton S. Kraievoy May 2 '11 at 13:25
    
...as long as equals() and hashCode() are defined on the objects which are in the collection ... note that lists don't use those methods at all. Additionally, Generics are not only about collections and there's no distinction between different uses of those wildcards (as of which type of class is made generic or which type of collection you have) - at least yet. –  Thomas May 2 '11 at 13:31
1  
Java is also restrictive in this regard: I am unable to create a wildcard directly: new ArrayList<? extends Number>(); Why would you want to do that? All you need to know is that the ArrayList holds objects of type Number and thus new ArrayList<Number>(); should be used. If you could use the ? notation you'd still have to check the type of each element. And what would the ? actually mean? - "You can put any object that is of type Number or a subclass into that list", which is exactly the same meaning as new ArrayList<Number>();. –  Thomas May 2 '11 at 13:33

The problem is that if you use List<? extends Number> you could actually do:

List<? extends Number> a = new ArrayList<Integer>();
List<? extends Number> b = new ArrayList<Double>();

a.addAll(b); //ouch, would add Doubles to an Integer list

The compiler can't tell from List<? extends Number> what the actual type parameter is and thus won't let you do the add operation.

You also shouldn't cast the lists to List<Number> if you get them as a parameter, since you could actually have a list of Integer objects and add Double objects to it.

In that case you better create a new List<Number> and add the objects from both lists:

List<Number> c = new ArrayList<Number>(a.size() + b.size());
c.addAll(a);
c.addAll(b);

Edit: in case you create both lists locally, you would not neet the ? wildcard anyway (since you'd always have List<Number>).

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Uhm... the workaround code was not correct at all. The idea is that I get two lists with a capture, so I'd recoded that code to reflect the idea. –  Anton S. Kraievoy May 2 '11 at 13:20
    
Deleted my comment on the "workaround" to prevent misinterpretation –  Thomas May 2 '11 at 13:27

Don't use the ? wildcard. It means "Some specific type I don't know", and since you don't know the type, you can't add anything to the list. Change your code to use List<Number> and everything will work.

This is fast becoming the most frequently asked Java question, in a hundred variations...

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Okay, okay, but what are general guides to using wildcards at all? –  Anton S. Kraievoy May 2 '11 at 13:39
1  
@Anton: Look here for a deeper explanation with examples: angelikalanger.com/GenericsFAQ/FAQSections/…? But in general, wildcards are only useful in a few rare cases. –  Michael Borgwardt May 2 '11 at 13:48

The thing is:

List<? extends Number> a = new ArrayList<Number>();
List<? extends Number> b = new ArrayList<Number>();

could also be read as:

List<x extends Number> a = new ArrayList<Number>();
List<y extends Number> b = new ArrayList<Number>();

How should the compiler know that x and y are the same?

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Well, I was quite sure that compiler has all information it needs. Not the case... :) –  Anton S. Kraievoy May 2 '11 at 13:55

PECS (producer-extends, consumer-super)

  • You cannot put anything into a type declared with an EXTENDS wildcard except for the value null, which belongs to every reference type
  • You cannot get anything out from a type declared with an SUPER wildcard except for a value of type Object, which is a super type of every reference type
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