Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose I've got a generic MyClass<T> that needs to compare two objects of type <T>. Usually I'd do something like ...

void DoSomething(T o1, T o2)
{
  if(o1.Equals(o2))
  {
    ...
  }
}

Now suppose my MyClass<T> has a constructor that supports passing a custom IEqualityComparer<T>, similar to Dictionary<T>. In that case I'd need to do ...

private IEqualityComparer<T> _comparer;
public MyClass() {}
public MyClass(IEqualityComparer<T> comparer)
{
  _comparer = comparer;
}
void DoSomething(T o1, T o2)
{
  if((_comparer != null && _comparer.Equals(o1, o2)) || (o1.Equals(o2)))
  {
    ...
  }
}

To remove this lengthy if statement, it'd be good if I could have _comparer default to a 'default comparer' if the regular constructor is used. I searched for something like typeof(T).GetDefaultComparer() but wasn't able to find anything like it.

I did find EqualityComparer<T>.Default, could I use that? And would then this snippet ...

public MyClass()
{
  _comparer = EqualityComparer<T>.Default;
}
void DoSomething(T o1, T o2)
{
  if(_comparer.Equals(o1, o2))
  {
    ...
  }
}

... provide the same results as using o1.Equals(o2) for all possible cases?

(As a side note, would this mean I'd also need to use any special generic constraint for <T>?)

share|improve this question
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

It should be the same, but it is not guaranteed, because it depends on implementation details of the type T.
Explanation:
Without a constraint to T, o1.Equals(o2) will call Object.Equals, even if T implements IEquatable<T>.
EqualityComparer<T>.Default however, will use Object.Equals only, if T doesn't implement IEquatable<T>. If it does implement that interface, it uses IEquatable<T>.Equals.
As long as T's implementation of Object.Equals just calls IEquatable<T>.Equals the result is the same. But in the following example, the result is not the same:

public class MyObject : IEquatable<MyObject>
{
    public int ID {get;set;}
    public string Name {get;set;}

    public override bool Equals(object o)
    {
        var other = o as MyObject;
        return other == null ? false : other.ID == ID;
    }    

    public bool Equals(MyObject o)
    {
        return o.Name == Name;
    } 
}

Now, it doesn't make any sense to implement a class like this. But you will have the same problem, if the implementer of MyObject simply forgot to override Object.Equals.

Conclusion:
Using EqualityComparer<T>.Default is a good way to go, because you don't need to support buggy objects!

share|improve this answer
6  
Any type with IEquatable.Equals and object.Equals doing different things is already doomed :) –  Marc Gravell May 2 '11 at 13:28
    
Thanks. Depending on my use-case, I could even specify a constraint like public MyClass<T> where T : IEquatable<T> then. Good stuff, you've all been extremely helpful. –  takrl May 3 '11 at 8:07
    
That return statement looks better like return other != null && other.ID == ID; –  nawfal Dec 15 '13 at 10:04
1  
If you override Equals, don't forget to override GetHashCode - stackoverflow.com/questions/23757210/… Compiler Warning (level 3) CS0659) –  ppittle May 20 at 10:39
add comment

You could use the null coaelescense operator ?? to shorten the if if it really matters

  if ((_comparer ?? EqualityComparer<T>.Default).Equals(o1, o2))
  {

  }
share|improve this answer
add comment

Yes, I think it would be wise to use the EqualityComparer<T>.Default, because it uses the implementation of IEquatable<T> if the type T implements it, or the override of Object.Equals otherwise. You could do it as follows:

private IEqualityComparer<T> _comparer;
public IEqualityComparer<T> Comparer
{
    get { return _comparer?? EqualityComparer<T>.Default;}
    set { _comparer=value;}
}
public MyClass(IEqualityComparer<T> comparer)
{  
    _comparer = comparer;
}
void DoSomething(T o1, T o2)
{  
    if(Comparer.Equals(o1, o2))
    {
     ...
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

That's exactly what Dictionary<> and other generic collections in the BCL do if you don't specify a comparer when constructing the object. The benefit of this is that EqualityComparer<T>.Default will return the right comparer for IEquatable<T> types, nullable types, and enums. If T is none of those, it will do a simple Equals comparison like you're old code is doing.

share|improve this answer
add comment

By default, until overridden in a class, Object.Equals(a,b)/a.Equals(b) performs comparison by reference.

What comparer will be returned by EqualityComparer<T>.Default depends on T. For example, if T : IEquatable<> then the appropriate EqualityComparer<T> will be created.

share|improve this answer
    
IEquatable<T> rather than IComparable –  Paul Creasey May 2 '11 at 13:28
    
@Paul: Sure, was writing by memory. Already edited. –  abatishchev May 2 '11 at 13:29
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.