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I'm writing a style sheet, and I want to display three elements horizontally (width=33%) within a container, with a relative layout. Here's the code:

 #container
 {
     margin:auto;
     width:85%;
     padding:0;
 }
 #element 
 {
    display:inline-block;
    width:33.3%;
    margin-left:0;
    margin-right:0;
    border:0px;
    text-align:center;
  }

I don't understand why with three elements:

<div id="container">
<div id="element">hi</div>
<div id="element">every</div>
<div id="element">one</div>
</div>

The last element is shown below the first two, while I believed that they would be drawn on the same line. There are no margins,padding or borders. If width is set to 32%, in a Full browser window, they are on the same line (it works), but when I reduce the browser-window width, the last element falls on a new line. Does anybody know why this happens?

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In all browsers? –  MeLight May 2 '11 at 13:54
    
Use a class name instead of an id for elements, ids should be unique in the document. Won't fix your problem, just saying. –  Jarrett Widman May 2 '11 at 13:55
    
@MeLight mmm I tried on FF 3.6 and on rekonq –  Archimedis May 2 '11 at 14:20
    
@Jarrett Widman yeah,you're right, i must be out of my mind O.o –  Archimedis May 2 '11 at 14:22
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

These are inline blocks, so they get laid out just like characters would (think of them as really big characters, basically). And in your case you have whitespace between them, so that whitespace becomes a single space on the line between the inline-blocks in the rendering; you can see this if you put borders on them. So the space taken up by all three together ends up being "99.9% of container width plus width of two spaces in the container's font". When you reduce to 32%, then you get line-breaking once two spaces add up to more than 4% of the container width (which is why it only happens at smaller container widths).

If you really want your inline-blocks flush up against each other, take out the spaces between them.

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Great! I knew that there was something else rendered, but I couldn't see it! Really, really thank you! –  Archimedis May 2 '11 at 14:33
    
You're very welcome! –  Boris Zbarsky May 2 '11 at 15:26
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Make you element a class (thanx Jarrett) and add float:left style to that class.

.element 
 {
    display:inline-block;
    width:33.3%;
    margin-left:0;
    margin-right:0;
    float:left;
    border:0px;
    text-align:center;
  }


<div id="container">
<div class="element">hi</div>
<div class="element">every</div>
<div class="element">one</div>
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
OMG, sorry for the id/class mistake (maybe I need to sleep xD).Anyway it works, thank you! =) Can you explain me why without the float property it doesn't work? –  Archimedis May 2 '11 at 14:08
1  
There's no point in using "inline-block" if you're going to float, since floating will force the display to "block"... But more importantly, you aren't asking the question that was asked, which was why the inline-block behavior is what it is. ;) –  Boris Zbarsky May 2 '11 at 14:18
    
be careful of floating. If your container is not on float, your element classes will out of the container box. If you put border around them and you will see that the height of the container is not expanded to match the class elements. Float is nasty and should be used with caution nesting. –  robx May 2 '11 at 17:56
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I recommend to play arround with the containers width. A tip that works for me is giving them a line. Below is my contribution:

http://jsfiddle.net/8dWhF/

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