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I've a generic class, that helps me to do checks on argument values

internal sealed class Argument<T>
    where T : class
{
    private void TraceAndThrow(Exception ex)
    {
        new InternalTraceHelper<T>().WriteError(ex);
        throw ex;
    }

    internal void ThrowNull(object value, string argName)
    {
        if (ReferenceEquals(value, null))
        {
            TraceAndThrow(new ArgumentNullException(argName));
        }
    }

    internal void ThrowIf(bool condition, string argName)
    {
        if (condition)
        {
            TraceAndThrow(new ArgumentException(null, argName));
        }
    }


    internal void ThrowNotInEnum(Type enumType, object value)
    {
        if (!Enum.IsDefined(enumType, value))
        {
            TraceAndThrow(new ArgumentOutOfRangeException(Resources.ArgEnumIllegalVal.InvariantFormat(value)));
        }
    }
}

But when I try to use it with a static class :

internal static class Class1
{
    private static Argument<Class1> _arg;
}

I got this error (at compilation):

static types cannot be used as type arguments

What I'm doing wrong?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

This is deliberate.

Static classes try to prevent inappropriate use, so in almost all situations, you can't use them in situations where you'd normally want an instance of the type... and that includes type arguments.

See section 10.1.1.3.1 of the C# 4 spec for the very limited set of situations in which you can refer to static class types.

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Doing my static classes non static but with a private constructor will do the job? So no one can instanciate it, but is non-static. Is this a good way to perform it? (Thanks for the section, I've read it) –  Arnaud F. May 2 '11 at 15:02
    
@Arnaud F.: Well that would work - but what are you using the type argument for? What's the point of it? It looks like it's only used by InternalTraceHelper, and we don't know what that's like. –  Jon Skeet May 2 '11 at 15:04
    
InternalTraceHelper does Trace.Write(), the argument type is used to define the category of the trace. Can be replaced by Trace.WriteLine("a message", typeof(T).FullName); // Where T = Class1 –  Arnaud F. May 2 '11 at 15:08
3  
@Arnaud F.: It sounds like you possibly want a non-generic version of InternalTraceHelper which takes a Type instead. In fact, you could make the whole class non-generic, just with a generic method to make creation simpler: InternalTraceHelper.Create<Foo> would call new InternalTraceHelper(typeof(T)) where T is the type parameter for the method. –  Jon Skeet May 2 '11 at 15:10
1  
Thanks a lot for the tip Master ! –  Arnaud F. May 2 '11 at 15:12

Generics only work with instances, not static classes.

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Is there a workaround? How can I manage it? I wouldn't check "manually" in static classes and using Argument<T> in the non-static one... –  Arnaud F. May 2 '11 at 14:50
    
No there isn't other than using System.Type. –  Daniel A. White May 2 '11 at 14:52
    
@Arnaud, you can't pass static types as arguments, so I fail to see when you'd ever want to have an Argument<StaticType>, unless I'm being misled by your class name. –  JSBձոգչ May 2 '11 at 14:53
    
Doing my static classes non static but with a private constructor will do the job? So no one can instanciate it, but is non-static. Is this a good way to perform it? –  Arnaud F. May 2 '11 at 14:53

Since static classes cannot be instantiated, it can never create Argument<T> with a static type.

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What you are doing wrong is using a static type as a generic type argument.

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Since static classes won't have instance members, my concern would be what kind of thing I'm going to do with them.

I believe that, missing that you can't use static classes as generic arguments, I believe that you need to this with extension methods instead of a generic class.

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