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double SumOfSquare()()
{
    int i;
    double T3,total=0;

    for(i=0;i<200;i++) {
        clock_t start = clock();

        int n=100,sum=0;
        for(int i =1;i<=n;i++) {
            sum=sum+i*i;
        }


    clock_t end = clock();
    T3=double(end-start)/(double) CLOCKS_PER_SEC;
    total=total+T3;
    }

    T3=total/200;

    return T3;
 }


 int main()
 {

    double T3=SumOfSquare();
    cout<<T3<<endl;
    return 0;
 }

This code is supposed to return a value for execution time of that code instead it returns some weird out put such as "5e-006" instead of the execution time. Why?

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4  
double SumOfSquare()() Really? –  James McNellis May 2 '11 at 14:55
    
ahh i copied the code wrong it must be with out the second brackets –  Anon May 2 '11 at 14:57
    
Please post a short, self-contained, complete example (see sscce.org). Your example could be shortened to reveal the true nature of your problem, is missing at least one line of code, and has compilation errors in it. –  Robᵩ May 2 '11 at 15:00
    
Tangentially related to your question: if you run this with optimizations, no matter how large of values you chose for your two loops, you'll probably get the same answer. The smart money is on the inner loop getting removed all together, and the whole thing basically becoming for(i = 0; i < 200; i++) total += (clock()-clock())/CLOCKS_PER_SEC; –  Dennis Zickefoose May 2 '11 at 15:01
1  
@Rob: While better formatting, and a proper copying of the original source would have improved the question, I'm unconvinced it could be made any shorter. He thought there was a problem with his function, so he provided it. And he provided why he believed the function was not operating properly. Had there actually been a problem, any less than this would have risked hiding his error. –  Dennis Zickefoose May 2 '11 at 15:08
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6 Answers 6

5e-006 is the same thing as 5 * 10^-6, or 0.000005. What makes you think that isn't the execution time?

(5e-006 is a number written in E notation.)

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yes i didnt understand that at first but thanks –  Anon May 2 '11 at 15:09
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T3 is a double and its value is 5 microseconds, so nothing is wrong.

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ahh so instead of outputing 0.000005 it say this –  Anon May 2 '11 at 14:57
    
@Anon - Floating point stream output will (pretty much) always print in exponential format. After all, the exponent could be really huge (or small), and printing all those zeroes would be kinda a waste of space. –  T.E.D. May 2 '11 at 15:01
    
@T.E.D. it's also more readable, assuming you understand the notation. –  Matt Ball May 2 '11 at 15:08
    
@T.E.D Floating point stream output will print in whatever format you tell it to. The default using scientific format when fixed format would cause too many zeros to be output. Which may or may not be the case, depending on the application. –  James Kanze May 2 '11 at 16:33
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Have a look at manipulators. They are used to format the output stream so you may get a more sensible looking result.

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Write your own manipulator, so you can specify logically what you're outputting. –  James Kanze May 2 '11 at 16:33
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5e-006 is simply the standard exponential notation for 5 * 10-6, i.e. 0.000005. This is the same as 6 µs.

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As others have already pointed out, you're getting 5 microseconds as a result, which seems at least reasonable as the time.

I would, however, compute the time a bit differently. I'd accumulate the number of "ticks" for the loop, then convert the total to seconds:

static const int iterations = 200;
clock_t total=0;
double seconds;

for(i=0;i<iterations;i++) {
    clock_t start = clock();

    int n=100,sum=0;
    for(int i =1;i<=n;i++) {
        sum=sum+i*i;
    }
    total += clock() - start;
}

return total/double(CLOCKS_PER_SEC*iterations);

Instead of a floating point division and floating point addition every iteration, this does an integer addition each iteration, and a single floating point division at the very end. On low-end hardware, this is likely to be faster. More importantly, it's likely to be more accurate, almost regardless of hardware -- adding a long list of small numbers in floating point is one of the cases that frequently leads to a substantial loss of precision.

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More importantly, I'd only do the call to clock before and after the outer loop. I'd also make sure that sum was used somewhere; there's a very good chance that the compiler eliminates the inner loop completely, since it doesn't have any effect on the observable behavior of the program. –  James Kanze May 2 '11 at 16:35
    
Hoisting the timing out of the loop would depend -- if you're trying to measure loop overhead, keeping in the loop could be important. Otherwise, I'd agree that timing the whole loop is probably better. I took for granted that is sum was used somewhere (at least it's not a local variable) but you're certainly right that it's better to state that explicitly. –  Jerry Coffin May 2 '11 at 16:42
    
@Jerry Coffin If the code in the loop is short, then you have to hoist the timing out of the loop to get any significant measurement; if the calls to clock are returning 0 or 1, you're not doing any significant measurement. If you're worried about the effect of loop overhead, then comparing with an empty loop might improve things (but it is, admittedly, far from exact). –  James Kanze May 2 '11 at 17:10
    
@Jerry Coffin And I think you missed the declaration for sum. It's a local variable, but since it was declared on the same line as another local variable, it's very easy to miss. –  James Kanze May 2 '11 at 17:11
    
@James Kanze: Oops, yes, so I did. As far as hoisting goes, yes, quite true. Basically, it depends on the granularity of results from clock compared to the time taken in the loop. –  Jerry Coffin May 2 '11 at 17:14
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The obvious answer is that your code only takes 5 microseconds to execute. Probably because you never use sum, so the compiler will eliminate any code used to modify its value (and thus the inner loop). More than anything else, your measurement is probably determined by the granularity of clock. You also want to measure over as large a period as possible: I'd be suspicious of the measurements if the two calls to clock are less than about 5 minutes a part (but of course, I'll use a much shorter interval when debugging the program:-)). My solution (and I'm not saying it's perfect) has generally been to put the code to be measured in a virtual function, in a derived class, with the function in the base class doing nothing, something like:

class Base
{
    static int ourCount;
    static double ourTare;
    virtual void doRun();
public:
    double run();
    static void setCount( int count );
};

int Base::ourCount = 0;
double Base::ourTare = 0.0;

void Base::doRun() {}

double Base::run()
{
    clock_t start = clock();
    for ( int count = ourCount; count > 0; -- count )
        doRun();
    clock_t end = clock();
    return (static_cast<double>(end - start) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC - ourTare;
}

void Base::setCount( int count )
{
    ourCount = count;
    ourTare = 0.0;
    //  The following has been sufficient in the past.  If the
    //  compiler inlines Base::run, however, it could be
    //  insufficent.  (In my own code, Base::run is in a
    //  separate translation unit.)`
    ourTare = Base().run();
}

class Derived
{
    int d;
    virtual void doRun();
public:
};

void Derived::doRun()
{
    int sum = 0;
    for ( int i = 1; i <= 100; ++ i ) {
        sum += i * i;
    }
    d = sum;
}

You then call Base::setCount with the count (for something simple like this, anything less than around a million is useless), create an instance of Derived, and call run on it to obtain the total time in seconds. You can divide it by the count if you want the time per iteration.

(A more flippant answer would be that the program outputs "5e-006" because the compiler is broken. That's not a legal output for any floating point value in C++.)

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