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I know can use string.find() to find a substring in a string.

But what is the easiest way to find out if one of the array items has a substring match in a string without using a loop?

Pseudocode:

string = 'I would like an apple.'
search = ['apple','orange', 'banana']
string.find(search) # == True
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3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

You could use a generator expression (which somehow is a loop)

any(x in string for x in search)

The generator expression is the part inside the parentheses. It creates an iterable that returns the value of x in string for each x in the tuple search. x in string in turn returns whether string contains the substring x. Finally, the Python built-in any() iterates over the iterable it gets passed and returns if any of its items evaluate to True.

Alternatively, you could use a regular expression to avoid the loop:

import re
re.search("|".join(search), string)

I would go for the first solution, since regular expressions have pitfalls (escaping etc.).

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2  
+1 for generator expression. -1 for regex. +1 for recommending against regex. Huzzah! +1! –  nmichaels May 2 '11 at 15:22
    
@nmichaels: I included the regex example only because of the "no loop" requirement. –  Sven Marnach May 2 '11 at 15:36
    
@Sven: I figured. My tongue was pretty firmly in cheek there; this is a solid answer. –  nmichaels May 2 '11 at 15:56
    
@Sven Marnach To cut the possible symbolic meaning of some characters in search , according to the rules of re, it can be done: re.search("|".join(re.escape(search)), string) What other pitfall then remain ? –  eyquem May 2 '11 at 16:17
    
@eyquem: In this particular example, escaping might be the only pitfall. –  Sven Marnach May 2 '11 at 16:25

Strings in Python are sequences, and you can do a quick membership test by just asking if one string exists inside of another:

>>> mystr = "I'd like an apple"
>>> 'apple' in mystr
True

Sven got it right in his first answer above. To check if any of several strings exist in some other string, you'd do:

>>> ls = ['apple', 'orange']
>>> any(x in mystr for x in ls)
True

Worth noting for future reference is that the built-in 'all()' function would return true only if all items in 'ls' were members of 'mystr':

>>> ls = ['apple', 'orange']
>>> all(x in mystr for x in ls)
False
>>> ls = ['apple', 'like']
>>> all(x in mystr for x in ls)
True
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The simpler is

import re
regx = re.compile('[ ,;:!?.:]')

string = 'I would like an apple.'
search = ['apple','orange', 'banana']

print any(x in regx.split(string) for x in search)

EDIT

Correction, after having read Sven's answer: evidently, string has to not be splited, stupid ! any(x in string for x in search) works pretty well

If you want no loop:

import re
regx = re.compile('[ ,;:!?.:]')

string = 'I would like an apple.'
search = ['apple','orange', 'banana']
print regx.split(string)

print set(regx.split(string)) & set(search)

result

set(['apple'])
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