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I'm using the Scala match/case statement to match an interface of a given java class. I want to be able to check if a class implements a combination of interfaces. The only way I can seem to get this to work is to use nested match/case statements which seems ugly.

Lets say I have a PersonImpl object which implements Person, Manager and Investor. I want to see if PersonImpl implements both Manager and Investor. I should be able to do the following:

person match {
  case person: (Manager, Investor) =>
    // do something, the person is both a manager and an investor
  case person: Manager =>
    // do something, the person is only a manager
  case person: Investor =>
    // do something, the person is only an investor
  case _ =>
    // person is neither, error out.
}

The case person: (Manager, Investor) just doesn't work. In order to get it to work I have to do the following which seem ugly.

person match {
  case person: Manager = {
    person match {
      case person: Investor =>
        // do something, the person is both a manager and investor
      case _ =>
        // do something, the person is only a manager
    }
  case person: Investor =>
    // do something, the person is only an investor.
  case _ =>
    // person is neither, error out.
}

This is just plain ugly. Any suggestions?

share|improve this question
    
case person: Manager with Investor ought to work. What happens when you call an Investor method on these objects that you say are only Manager? – Daniel C. Sobral May 2 '11 at 20:14
    
It would be great if you could either accept an answer or tell us what other things you would like to know about this topic. – Jean-Philippe Pellet May 24 '11 at 9:42

Try this:

case person: Manager with Investor => // ...

with is used for other scenarios where you might want to express type intersection, e.g. in a type bound:

def processGenericManagerInvestor[T <: Manager with Investor](person: T): T  = // ...

By the way — not that this is recommended practice, but — you can always test it like this as well: if (person.isInstanceOf[Manager] && person.isInstanceOf[Investor]) ....


Edit: this works well for me:

trait A
trait B
class C

def printInfo(a: Any) = println(a match {
  case _: A with B => "A with B"
  case _: A => "A"
  case _: B => "B"
  case _ => "unknown"
})

def main(args: Array[String]) {
  printInfo(new C)               // prints unknown
  printInfo(new C with A)        // prints A
  printInfo(new C with B)        // prints B
  printInfo(new C with A with B) // prints A with B
  printInfo(new C with B with A) // prints A with B
}
share|improve this answer
    
I just tested case person: Manager with Investor and unfortunately it didn't work. It catches persons that implement only Manager as well as persons that implement both. Is this a bug? – user523078 May 2 '11 at 16:27
    
Funny. I've added a short example in my answer that works well for me with Scala 2.8.1. Which version are you using? – Jean-Philippe Pellet May 2 '11 at 16:33
    
You are correct. I just ran your example and it worked. In my case I'm not using traits as the "class" is a java and is implementing an interface, but I don't think that should matter. – user523078 May 2 '11 at 18:30
    
Because my situation isn't pure scala, its a scala, java mixture, here is what I had to do to get it to work. person match { case person if (person.isInstanceOf[Manager] && person.isInstanceOf[Investor]) => // do something, the person is both a manager and an investor case person: Manager => // do something, the person is only a manager case person: Investor => // do something, the person is only an investor case _ => // person is neither, error out. } I still don't like this but its better than nested case statements. – user523078 May 2 '11 at 19:03
    
It works with me even if I define A, B and C in Java. Sounds like a bug to me. Are you compiling the Java classes yourself? – Jean-Philippe Pellet May 2 '11 at 19:20

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