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Say I have an HTML page:

<body>
<div id="header">
    <h1>Header title</h1>
    header content (one or multiple lines)
</div>
<div id="content">
    bla bla bla
</div>
</body>

and the corresponding CSS:

#header {
    height: 150px;
}

The header section is of fixed height but the header content may change. I would like to content of the header to be vertically aligned to the bottom of the header section, so the last line of text "sticks" to the bottom of the header section.

So if there is only one line of text it would be like:

-----------------------------
| Header title
|
|
|
| header content (resulting in one line)
-----------------------------

bla bla bla

And if there were three lines:

-----------------------------
| Header title
|
| header content (which is so
| much stuff that it perfectly
| spans over three lines)
-----------------------------

bla bla bla

How can this be done in CSS?

share|improve this question

13 Answers 13

up vote 510 down vote accepted

Relative+absolute positioning is your best bet:

<style type="text/css">
  #header { position: relative; }
  #header-content { position: absolute; bottom: 0; left: 0; }
</style>
<div id="header">
  <h1>Title</h1>
  <div id="header-content">Some content</div>
</div>

But you may run into issues with that. When I tried it I had problems with dropdown menus appearing below the content. It's just not pretty.

Honestly, for vertical centering issues and, well, any vertical alignment issues with the items aren't fixed height, it's easier just to use tables.

Example: Can you do this HTML layout without using tables?

share|improve this answer
2  
I actually found that solution before asking here, but somehow forgot to add the position: relative; to the header div and the content kept landing at the bottom of the page. Thanks –  kristof Feb 25 '09 at 13:49
6  
You can manage your dropdown position with the z-index property to bring it to front. Remember that the z-index property works with elements positioned relatively or absolutely. Also, is not correct semantically speaking to use a table to achieve layout results. –  Alejandro Iglesias Jul 25 '12 at 19:16
    
In the case of text content as described in the original problem, #header-content should really be a p element, or at the very least a span –  Josh Burgess Feb 11 at 21:18
    
if #header has a fixed height, here is a quick hack: #header-content { position: relative; bottom: -4px; } (change the -4px to whatever value works for you), this is kinda dirty but has the advantage of letting #header keep its positioning (ie. static) if required. Otherwise, go for @Cletus solution. –  Adrien Be Jun 3 at 12:49

Use CSS positioning.

/* creates a new stacking context on the header */
#header
{ 
    position: relative; 
}

/* positions header-content at the bottom of header's context */
#header-content 
{ 
    position: absolute; 
    bottom: 0; 
}

As cletus noted, you need identify the header-content to make this work.

<span id="header-content">some header content</span> 
share|improve this answer
    
+1. Thanks for the answer, I accepted the one by cletus as it pointed me into the right drection first –  kristof Feb 25 '09 at 13:45
    
fyi ... this caused my header-content to collapse its width, so I had to add a width = '100%' on the header-content –  dsdsdsdsd Nov 5 '13 at 16:28
    
@dsdsdsdsd You could also fix that by adding display:block to #header-content. –  Patrick McElhaney Apr 22 at 20:37

I use these properties and it works!

#header
{
   display: table-cell;
   vertical-align: bottom;
}
share|improve this answer
31  
table-cell isn't supported in IE. –  Ben Aug 16 '10 at 3:45
22  
Isn't supported in IE8 and earlier. It IS supported in IE9. –  cale_b Jun 5 '12 at 22:47
6  
Most users that use IE are internet users that are not much familiar with how internet works thus never upgrading their browser. So consider this if you would choose this option :) –  Henrik Petterson Aug 10 '12 at 13:52
7  
Doesn't look to work in Chrome :/ –  fguillen Sep 21 '12 at 14:46
12  
@cale_b According to caniuse.com it DOES work in IE8. –  Zach L Feb 28 '13 at 19:08

Inline or inline-block elements can be aligned to the bottom of block level elements if the line-height of the parent/block element is greater than that of the inline element.*

markup:

<h1 class="alignBtm"><span>I'm at the bottom</span></h1>

css:

h1.alignBtm { line-height:3em; }
h1.alignBtm span { line-height:1.2em; vertical-align:bottom;}

*make sure you're in standards mode

share|improve this answer
    
+1, just had to say thanks. That bit about the line-height of the parent having to be greater than that of the child saved me so much frustration today. –  Dominic P Jun 18 '13 at 22:54

I know this is over 2 years old, but I have devised a way which is a lot simpler than whats been mentioned.

Set the height of the header div. Then inside that, style your H1 tag as follows:

float: left;
padding: 90px 10px 11px

I'm working on a site for a client, and the design requires the text to be at the bottom of a certain div. I've achieved the result using these two lines and it works fine. Also, if the text does expand, the padding will still remain the same.

share|improve this answer
    
Good answer, but only if you know the height of the header div. –  Jayden Lawson Jan 27 at 11:24

try with:

div.myclass { margin-top: 100%; }

try changing the % to fix it. Example: 120% or 90% ...etc.

share|improve this answer
    
I didn't vote down, but this won't work, as it's relevant to the div, not relevant to the text inside the div. –  Daedalus Jan 21 '13 at 5:05
    
Works perfectly fine with 1 set of content, but will need to be adjusted if the content changes. If it's dynamic content, then dont use this! –  Mike Graf Feb 8 '13 at 16:42

A perfect cross-browser example is probably this one here:

http://www.csszengarden.com/?cssfile=/213/213.css&page=0

The idea is both to display the div at the bottom and also making it stick there. Often the simple approach will make the sticky div scroll up with the main content.

Following is a fully working minimal example. Note that there's no div embedding trickery required. The many BRs are just to force a scrollbar to appear:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
    "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html>
<head>
    <style>
        * {
            margin: 0;
            padding: 0;
        }

        #floater {
            background: yellow;
            height: 200px;
            width: 100%;
            position: fixed;
            bottom: 0px;
            z-index: 5;
            border-top: 2px solid gold;
        }

    </style>
</head>


<body>
    <br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/>
    <br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/>
    <br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/>
    <br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/>


    <div id="floater"></div>
</body>
</html>

If you are wondering your code might not be working on IE, remember to add the DOCTYPE tag at the top. It's crucial for this to work on IE. Also, this should be the first tag and nothing should appear above it.

share|improve this answer
27  
Since you're declaring your document as XHTML strict, you should also self-close your <br /> tags... –  Amos M. Carpenter Nov 14 '11 at 6:17
7  
@KarlKildén if you were referring to the comment from aaamos, it most definitely isn't a silly comment - serving the above document with its correct content-type header would result in the browser throwing an xml parsing error. –  Razor Dec 14 '12 at 13:16
4  
This is a bad practise! Use CSS instead! –  m93a Sep 28 '13 at 11:14

The site I just did for a client requested that the footer text was a high box, with the text at the bottom I achieved this with simple padding, should work for all browsers.

    <div id="footer">
        some text here
    </div>

#footer { padding: 0 30px; padding-top: 60px; padding-bottom: 8px; }
share|improve this answer
    
Your first declaration padding: 0 30px is a bit redundant, you may as well have put padding: 30px then the other 2 declarations. –  TheWaxMann Oct 15 '13 at 7:57
    
Absolutely true, however I'm following the practices of my workplace. –  Nicki L. Hansen Oct 15 '13 at 8:07
3  
Really?, that seems like plain bad practice. Just use the shorthand, or be explicit everywhere. padding: 60px 30px 8px;, padding: 60px 30px 8px 30px;, four explicit padding- rules, or even @TheWaxMann's suggestion are all superior - and I'm willing and able to argue that one ;-) –  Zach L Dec 18 '13 at 15:10

If you have multiple, dynamic height items, use the CSS display values of table and table-cell:

HTML

<html>
<body>

  <div class="valign bottom">
    <div>

      <div>my bottom aligned div 1</div>
      <div>my bottom aligned div 2</div>
      <div>my bottom aligned div 3</div>

    </div>
  </div>

</body>
</html>

CSS

html, body { width: 100%; height: 100%; }
.valign { display: table; width: 100%; height: 100%; }
.valign > div { display: table-cell; width: 100%; height: 100%; }
.valign.bottom > div { vertical-align: bottom; }

I've created a JSBin demo here: http://jsbin.com/INOnAkuF/2/edit

The demo also has an example how to vertically center align using the same technique.

share|improve this answer

Seems to be working:

#content {
    /* or just insert a number with "px" if you're fighting CSS without lesscss.org :) */
    vertical-align: -@header_height + @content_height;

    /* only need it if your content is <div>,
     * if it is inline (e.g., <a>) will work without it */
    display: inline-block;
}

Using less makes solving CSS puzzles much more like coding than like... I just love CSS. It's a real pleasure when you can change the whole layout (without breaking it :) just by changing one parameter.

share|improve this answer

if you could set the height of the wrapping div of the content (#header-content as shown in other's reply), instead of the entire #header, maybe you can also try this approach:

HTML

<div id="header">
    <h1>some title</h1>
    <div id="header-content">
        <span>
            first line of header text<br>
            second line of header text<br>
            third, last line of header text
        </span>
    </div>
</div>

CSS

#header-content{
    height:100px;
}

#header-content::before{
  display:inline-block;
  content:'';
  height:100%;
  vertical-align:bottom;
}

#header-content span{
    display:inline-block;
}

show on codepen

share|improve this answer

After struggling with this same issue for some time, I finally figured out a solution that meets all of my requirements:

  • Does not require that I know the container's height.
  • Unlike relative+absolute solutions, the content doesn't float in its own layer (i.e., it embeds normally in the container div).
  • Works across browsers (IE8+).
  • Simple to implement.

The solution just takes one <div>, which I call the "aligner":

CSS

.bottom_aligner {
    display: inline-block;
    height: 100%;
    vertical-align: bottom;
    width: 0px;
}

html

<div class=bottom_aligner></div>
... Your content here ...

This trick works by creating a tall, skinny div, which pushes the text baseline to the bottom of the container.

Here is a complete example that achieves what the OP was asking for. I've made the "bottom_aligner" thick and red for demonstration purposes only.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <style>
.outer-container {
    border: 2px solid black;
    height: 175px;
    width: 300px;
}

.top-section {
    background: lightgreen;
    height:50%;
}

.bottom-section {
    background: lightblue;
    height:50%;
    marin:8px;
}

.bottom-aligner {
    display: inline-block;
    height: 100%;
    vertical-align: bottom;
    width:3px;
    background: red;
}

.bottom-content {
    display: inline-block;
}

.top-content {
    padding: 8px;
}
    </style>
</head>

<body>
    <div class=outer-container>
        <div class=top-section>
            This text <br> is on top.
        </div>
        <div class=bottom-section>
            <div class=bottom-aligner></div><div class=bottom-content>
                I like it here <br> at the bottom.
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>
</body>
</html>

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
<head>
    <title>Test</title>
    <style type="text/css">
    table { width:500px; border-collapse:collapse}
    th, td { border:1px solid black; vertical-align: top;}
    th { width:100px; }
    td { background:#ccc; }
    .wrap { position:relative; height:100%; padding-bottom:1em; background:#aaa; 
            height:200px;}
    .manage { text-align:right; position:absolute; bottom:0; right:0; }
    p{ margin: 0 0 5px 0; }
    </style>
</head>
<body >
<table>
    <tr>
        <th>Mauris tortor nulla, sagittis ut, faucibus eu, imperdiet ut, libero.</th>
        <td>
            <div class="wrap">
                <p><a href="http://www.pronexo.com">www.pronexo.com</a></p>
                <div class="manage">Edit | Delete</div>
           </div>
        </td>
    </tr>

    <tr>
        <th>Cras diam.</th>
        <td>
            <div class="wrap">
                <p>Mauris tortor nulla, sagittis ut, faucibus eu, imperdiet ut,
                libero. Sed elementum. Praesent porta, tellus ut dictum
                ullamcorper, est ante condimentum metus, non molestie lorem
                turpis in sapien. Aenean id enim. Nullam placerat blandit ante
                Aenean ac ligula.</p>
                <div class="manage">Edit | Delete</div>
            </div>
        </td>
    </tr>
</table>
</body>
share|improve this answer

protected by Mohammad Adil Dec 1 '13 at 14:20

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