Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Here's an output from less:

487451
487450<A3><BA>1<A3><BA>1
487449<A3><BA>1<A3><BA>1
487448<A3><BA>1<A3><BA>1
487447<A3><BA>1<A3><BA>1
487446<A3><BA>1<A3><BA>1
487445<A3><BA>1<A3><BA>1
484300<A3><BA>1<A3><BA>1
484299<A3><BA>1<A3><BA>1
484297<A3><BA>1<A3><BA>1
484296<A3><BA>1<A3><BA>1
484295<A3><BA>1<A3><BA>1
484294<A3><BA>1<A3><BA>1
484293<A3><BA>1<A3><BA>1
483496
483495
483494
483493
483492
483491

I see a bunch of nonprintable characters here. How do I remove them using sed/tr?

My try was 's/\([0-9][0-9]*\)/\1/g', but it doesn't work.

EDIT: Okay, let's go further down the source. The numbers are extracted from this file:

487451"><img src="Manage/pic/20100901/Adidas running-429.JPG" alt="Adidas running-429" height="120" border="0" class="BK01" onload='javascript:if(this.width>160){this.width=160}' /></a></td>
487450"><img src="Manage/pic/20100901/Adidas fs 1<A3><BA>1-060.JPG" alt="Adidas fs 1<A3><BA>1-060" height="120" border="0" class="BK01" onload='javascript:if(this.width>160){this.width=160}' /></a></td>

The first line is perfectly normal and what most of the lines are. The second is "corrupted". I'd just like to extract the number at the beginning (using 's/\([0-9][0-9]*\).*/\1/g', but somehow the nonprintables get into the regex, which should stop at ".

EDIT II: Here's a clarification: There are no brackets in the text file. These are character codes of nonprintable characters. The brackets are there because I copied the file from less. Mac's Terminal, on the other hand, uses ?? to represent such characters. I bet xterm on my Ubuntu would print that white oval with a question mark.

share|improve this question
    
Do you want to remove <A3> in output or just want to replace that with 3? –  anubhava May 2 '11 at 16:55
    
I want to remove everything after the first six digits (it's six only here, it varies in the actual file). –  Mike May 2 '11 at 17:02
    
Alright, I posted my answer below. Please try and let me know. –  anubhava May 2 '11 at 17:07
    
The is the most amazing guide if you ever wanna use unix regex: tutorialspoint.com/unix/unix-regular-expressions.htm –  Omar A. Shaban Jun 2 '13 at 13:21

5 Answers 5

Classic job for either sed's or Unix's tr command.

sed 's/[^0-9]//g' $file

(Anything that is not a digit - or newline - is deleted.)

tr -cd '0-9\012' < $file > $file.1

Delete (-d) the complement (-c) of the digits and newline...

share|improve this answer
    
I've already tried that tr and it gives me tr: Illegal byte sequence. I don't think it wants to read the nonprintables. –  Mike May 2 '11 at 17:16
1  
Then you must be running in a UTF-8 locale (or something similar), but reading an 8859-1 file. The data is not valid UTF-8, so you can't process it with the UTF-8 locale set using programs that are aware of locale. That is a source of irritation to all concerned. The simplest workaround may be to set LANG=C in the environment, and see whether that is sufficient. It may not be sufficient; you may have to set LC_CTYPE (or LC_ALL) to something that uses 8859-1 instead. –  Jonathan Leffler May 2 '11 at 20:31

You missed the bit where you match the rest of the line.

sed 's/\([0-9][0-9]*\)[^0-9]*/\1/g' 
                      ^^^^^^^
share|improve this answer

Try this sed command:

sed 's/^\([0-9][0-9]*\).*$/\1/' file.txt

OUTPUT (running above command on the input file you provided)

487451
487450
487449
487448
487447
487446
487445
484300
484299
484297
484296
484295
484294
484293
483496
483495
483494
483493
483492
483491
share|improve this answer
    
Nope, no change, (tested by diffing the ods). :-( –  Mike May 2 '11 at 17:14
    
@Mike: I provided you my output also from the above sed command. Is that not what you expect the output to be? And I tested it both on Linux and Mac. –  anubhava May 2 '11 at 17:18

If you know the crap will always be inside brackets, why not delete that crap?

sed 's/<[^>]*>//g'

EDIT: Thanks, Mike that makes sense. In that case, how about:

sed 's/([0-9]+).*/\1/g'
share|improve this answer
    
I'm pretty sure the brackets are just less's way of representing nonprintable characters. –  Mike May 2 '11 at 16:54
    
Ah. Makes sense. –  josh.trow May 2 '11 at 17:00

If the data always is like the sample, deleting from the less-than to the end of the line would work fine. sed -i "s/<.*$//" file

share|improve this answer
    
Please re-read the question. There is no less-than character in the file. –  jcsanyi Jun 7 '13 at 3:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.