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I have Javascript object like:

var data = {
    Id: 1,
    Name: "Some name",
    Days: [true, true, true, false, false, true, false]
};

These objects are generated on the client and I want to visualise them by using jQuery.tmpl plugin. I've defined a template to be:

<ul class="days">
{{each Days}}
    <li class="day {{if $value}}on{{else}}off{{/if}}">${$index + 1}</li>
{{/each}}
</ul>

When I call

$("<ul class='days'>...</ul>").tmpl(data);

I only get a set of LI elements and no wrapping UL around them...

What am I missing here?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to move that template code to a <script> element (if you haven't already), like this:

<script type="text/x-jquery-tmpl" id="daysTemplate">
  <ul class="days">
  {{each Days}}
    <li class="day {{if $value}}on{{else}}off{{/if}}">${$index + 1}</li>
  {{/each}}
  </ul>
</script>

Then, select and render that template like this:

// You can inject the result into any container, using methods like appendTo()
//  html(), insert(), etc.
$('#daysTemplate').tmpl(data).appendTo('body');
share|improve this answer
    
You're right. Silly me. I have to wrap my template into some element. <script> is actually not mandatory when providing template as string. I tried wrapping it inside <template> tag and it worked just as well. <script> is of course highly recommended when template is part of page's markup. But you're right about wrapping my template into an element. Accepted your answer for that. – Robert Koritnik May 2 '11 at 17:08
    
You're right, it's valid to define the entire template inline as a string. One reason to avoid that though, FYI, is that .tmpl() automatically caches the compiled templating function when you use a script container (or other named container element), but doesn't when you supply an arbitrary string. So, repeat renderings during the same pageview are faster with the script container approach. – Dave Ward May 2 '11 at 17:12
    
That's valuable information. Although my template gets rendered once when page loads and afterwards only when user changes a selection in a drop down which would seldom happen. Caching works per page life basis so page will more often get reloaded than template will get re-used. But will have to remember this when using templates in other situations (which I do and in those cases I'm fortunately already using script tag). I'd vote you up if I could once more. – Robert Koritnik May 2 '11 at 17:48

I created a fiddle here and it works. template

<script id="daysTemplate" type="text/x-jquery-tmpl">
     <ul class="days">
    {{each Days}}
        <li class="day {{if $value}}on{{else}}off{{/if}}">${$index + 1}</li>
    {{/each}}
    </ul>
</script>

script

var data = {
    Id: 1,
    Name: "Some name",
    Days: [true, true, true, false, false, true, false]
};
$("#daysTemplate").tmpl(data).appendTo('body');
share|improve this answer
    
+1: You're right when you say that my template works. But the main thing is it has to be wrapped into a tag (in your case it's script tag). – Robert Koritnik May 2 '11 at 17:08

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