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You initialize an int variable defined within a method to have a value of 0 until you compute specific values for the int. What can one initialize char values to?
char retChar = '';this gives an error and if I initialise to -1 it says too many characters.

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"You initialize an int variable defined within a method to have a value of 0 until you compute specific values for the int" ... speak for yourself. I use Integer if I want to do that, not int. –  skaffman May 2 '11 at 16:53

5 Answers 5

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Typically for local variables I initialize them as late as I can. It's rare that I need a "dummy" value. However, if you do, you can use any value you like - it won't make any difference, if you're sure you're going to assign a value before reading it.

If you want the char equivalent of 0, it's just Unicode 0, which can be written as

char c = '\0';

That's also the default value for an instance (or static) variable of type char.

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Either you initialize the variable to something

char retChar = 'x';

or you leave it automatically initialized, which is

char retChar = '\0';

an ascii 0, the same as

char retChar = (char) 0;

What can one initialize char values to?

Sounds undecided between automatic initialisation, which means, you have no influence, or explicit initialisation. But you cannot change the default.

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i would just do:

char x = 0; //Which will give you an empty value of character
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you can initialize it to ' ' instead. Also, the reason that you received an error -1 being too many characters is because it is treating '-' and 1 as separate.

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it says empty character literal. So, '' is probably not allowed. –  Pan May 2 '11 at 17:03
    
Maybe he meant ' ' (single blank space)? –  asgs May 2 '11 at 17:10
    
yes sorry, the single quotes are a little close together. I meant you can initialize it to a space ' ' which is allowed. –  John Kane May 2 '11 at 17:16

Perhaps 0 or '\u0000' would do?

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