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I'm trying to learn ruby more in depth before I move on to rails dev, but I'm having some issues learning classes. I can't seem to understand why the following doesn't work.

#point.rb
class Point
  attr_accessor :x, :y

  def initialize(p = [0,0])
   @x = p[0]
   @y = p[1]
  end
end

#shape.rb
require_relative 'point.rb'

class Shape

  attr_accessor :points

  def initialize *the_points
    for p in the_points
      @points.append Point.new(p)
    end
  end

end

s = Shape.new([3,2])

puts s.points

When I call the function I get a no method error for NilClass, which I'm assuming is referring to @point.append.

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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

First, try this:

def initialize *the_points
  @points = []
  for p in the_points
    @points << Point.new(p)
  end
end

You get NilClass error because @points instance variable is Nil, and NilClass, which does not have append() method.

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Now I'm getting a different error: shape.rb:11:in block in initialize: undefined method 'append' for []:Array (NoMethodError) Which is really confusing to me, since I'd think that array would be fine with append. I'm on ruby 1.9.2 if that matters. –  tshauck May 2 '11 at 17:31
1  
@tshauck - you can use push or << instead, there is no append method on Array. –  McStretch May 2 '11 at 17:33
    
Hmm... This is a little surprising, but I don't see Array#append in Ruby 1.9.2. You should probably use << (e.g., @points << Point.new(p)) –  rmk May 2 '11 at 17:37
    
muchas gracias @rmk and @McStretch –  tshauck May 2 '11 at 17:37
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If you had warnings on (ruby -w or $VERBOSE = true), it'd warn you that @points didn't exist.

See some other debugging tips in How do I debug ruby scripts?

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Better than creating an array and populating it in a loop would be to initialize it like so:

class Shape
  attr_accessor :points

  def initialize *the_points
    @points = the_points.map{ |p| Point.new(p) }
  end
end
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1  
Point-free style FTW: the_points.map(&Point.method(:new)). Actually, I had this idea that classes are procedures, namely they are procedures that produce instances. And just like any object which is a procedure in Ruby, they should implement to_proc, so that you could write the_points.map(&Point). The monkey patch for that is simple: class Class; def to_proc; proc(&method(:new)) end end. –  Jörg W Mittag May 3 '11 at 3:35
    
@Jörg I wish you got rep for comment upvotes, because that's some crazy good thinking you're sharing here. :) –  Phrogz May 3 '11 at 3:51
    
I think I posted that somewhere. At least I just found it in my StackOverflow snippets directory, but maybe it's for an answer I meant to give but never posted. –  Jörg W Mittag May 3 '11 at 3:57
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You need to initialize @points to be a new array. It starts off as nil.

  def initialize *the_points
    @points = [];
    for p in the_points
      @points.append Point.new(p)
    end
  end
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