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I have an ByteArrayOutputStream connected with a Dataline from an AudioSource. I need to convert the Stream in some significative values that probally are the sound values taken from source or not ? Well then how can I conver the byteArray (from ByteArrayOutStream.getByteArray()) in a intArray?. I googled it but with no luck .

p.s. the audioFormat that I used is : PCM_SIGNED 192.0Hz 16Bit big endian

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what do you need the conversion from an byte array to an int array for? –  John Kane May 2 '11 at 18:00
2  
Did you mean 192 Kilo Hz? –  Andrew Thompson May 2 '11 at 18:03

3 Answers 3

Use a ByteBuffer. You can convert not only to different array types this way, but also deal with endian issues.

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You can try the following:

ByteBuffer.wrap(byteArray).asIntBuffer().array()
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1  
UnsupportedOperationException –  shmosel Oct 29 '14 at 19:24

When you do ByteArrayOutStream.toByteArray(), you get: byte[]. So now, I assume you need to convert byte[] to int.

You can do this:

/**
 * Convert the byte array to an int.
 *
 * @param b The byte array
 * @return The integer
 */
public static int byteArrayToInt(byte[] b) {
    return byteArrayToInt(b, 0);
}

/**
 * Convert the byte array to an int starting from the given offset.
 *
 * @param b The byte array
 * @param offset The array offset
 * @return The integer
 */
public static int byteArrayToInt(byte[] b, int offset) {
    int value = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++) {
        int shift = (4 - 1 - i) * 8;
        value += (b[i + offset] & 0x000000FF) << shift;
    }
    return value;
}
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for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++) { int shift = (4 - 1 - i) * 8; value += (b[i + offset] & 0x000000FF) << shift; } i dont understand this code ... i<4 means that 1 byte is maked by 4 bit ? –  relu May 2 '11 at 18:04
    
No an integer is 4 bytes so you just add one byte after the other at the correct position - although personally I wouldn't use an add to do that, that works fine too (minimally slower but if you don't call the function billion of times that's hardly important). Anyways use of a ByteBuffer should be preferred. Also note that doesn't take endianness into account. –  Voo May 2 '11 at 19:12

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