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I'm still very much a neophyte in using STL. The following code fragment populates a 3D vector (S) and compiles (g++) fine.

const int maxBonds = 6;
vector< vector< vector<int> > > S;
S.resize(maxBonds);
populate(S); // function that returns S with various layers filled with int data in rows and columns.
for (vector<vector<vector<int> > >::iterator Slayer = S.begin(); Slayer != S.end(); Slayer++) {
    cout << "Layer contains " << Slayer->size() << " rows" << endl;
    for (vector<vector<int> >::iterator Srow = Slayer->begin(); Srow != Slayer->end(); Srow++) {
        for (vector<int>::iterator Scol = Srow->begin(); Scol != Srow->end(); Scol++) {
            cout << *Scol;
        }
        cout << endl;
    }
    cout << endl;
}

This runs fine:

Layer contains 0 rows

Layer contains 5 rows
000
200
020
220
002

Layer contains 12 rows
100
010
210
... // etc.

However, I'd like to print out the value of the outer iterators (Slayer, Srow) during iteration. How do I properly dereference the current value of Slayer, i.e.

 cout << "Layer # " << Slayer->??? << " contains " << Slayer->size() << " rows" << endl;
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is not Slayer an iterator? Does not *Slayer work simply? –  Umut Tabak May 2 '11 at 18:08
1  
@Umut - works, but it would be a vector and you cannot print a vector just like that. –  Kiril Kirov May 2 '11 at 18:10
    
@Kiril, indeed, that is a vector<vector<int> > –  Umut Tabak May 2 '11 at 18:11
    
@Rolf, you might formulate the problem in a better way for future reference perhaps, formulating the 3d thing with a pointer to vector<vector<int> > decreases the level of nests, sth like that... –  Umut Tabak May 2 '11 at 18:14
    
@Umut: trying to do cout << *Slayer does not work, the << operator cannot be used here. –  Rolf May 2 '11 at 18:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If what you need is the current vector "index", i think that the standard way to do this is to increment another value.

unsigned int countSlayer = 0;

for (vector<vector<vector<int> > >::iterator Slayer = S.begin(); Slayer != S.end(); Slayer++, ++countSlayer) {

    cout << "Layer # " << countSlayer << " contains " << Slayer->size() << " rows" << endl;

    for (vector<vector<int> >::iterator Srow = Slayer->begin(); Srow != Slayer->end(); Srow++) {
        for (vector<int>::iterator Scol = Srow->begin(); Scol != Srow->end(); Scol++) {
            cout << *Scol;
        }
        cout << endl;
    }
    cout << endl;
}

You can also try to subtract begin() from the iterator but it doesn't work well with all iterators types (I lack time for making some tests).

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Thanks! That works very simply :-) –  Rolf May 2 '11 at 18:50

So *Scol gets you the int within the last vector, *Srow would get you the vector of the row, *Slayer would get you the vector of the layers containing the vector of rows.

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And this helps how exactly? –  Kiril Kirov May 2 '11 at 18:09

You can't do this directly.

The way I'd do it - define an function with a loop to do this for you.


Something like:

void Print2dIntVector( const vector<vector<int> >& v )
{
    // ..
}
void Print3dIntVector( const vector< vector< vector<int> > >& v )
{
    // ..
}

Advice - use typedef, instead of writing all these long, nested vectors.

EDIT: Of cource, you can always overload operator<< for these types (vectors)

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