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Treatment ( StaffNo , PatientID , StartDate , Reason )

Find the staff numbers of all doctors who treat all the patients treated by the doctor whose staff number is 603.

In Relational Algebra

Divide (Project Treatment Over StaffNo, PatientId) By Project (Select Treatment Where StaffNumber = ‘603’) Over PatientId

I want it in SQL, please.

Is this SQL Right ?

SELECT DISTINCT staff_no
FROM treatment AS t1
WHERE NOT EXISTS (SELECT *
                  FROM treatment as s2
                  WHERE s2.staff_no = '603'
                    AND NOT EXISTS (SELECT *
                                    FROM treatment AS t3
                                    WHERE t1.staff_no = t3.staff_no
                                      AND t3.patient_id = s2.patient_id));
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Michael Petrotta, mellamokb, Isaac Truett, John Saunders, Graviton May 5 '11 at 0:57

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
What have you tried, and where are you stuck? – Michael Petrotta May 2 '11 at 18:06
    
1  
I want it in SQL, please. is not a question. Tell us what you've tried, and where you are having issues. If you don't get any of it, it sounds like you need to go back to the basics again. – mellamokb May 2 '11 at 18:12
    
I want in USD, but that isn't really what this site is for. See the FAQ – Isaac Truett May 2 '11 at 18:12
    
I want SQL statements to represent . Find the staff numbers of all doctors who treat all the patients treated by the doctor whose staff number is 603 – Prince May 2 '11 at 18:16

Thank you Everybody for your help.

I found the answer.

This SQL is informally equivalent to Relational divide.

SELECT DISTINCT staff_no
FROM treatment AS t1
WHERE NOT EXISTS (SELECT *
                  FROM treatment as s2
                  WHERE s2.staff_no = '603'
                   AND NOT EXISTS (SELECT *
                                    FROM treatment AS t3
                                    WHERE t1.staff_no = t3.staff_no
                                      AND t3.patient_id = s2.patient_id));
share|improve this answer

There is no direct translation from relational algebra to SQL, as SQL is more analagous to relational calculus. Relational algebra is procedural; you're defining how to get the data you want. Relational calculus (and SQL) define what data you want, and leave the implementation up to the RDBMS.

That being said, there is no equivalent of relational algebra's division operator in SQL. You will have to state what you want more clearly.

As a note, questions that are related to schoolwork are strongly encouraged to make that clear (and since this question is about relational algebra, my suspicion is that it is); if this is for school, please be honest about that.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok , Forget Relational algebra . I want this query "Find the staff numbers of all doctors who treat all the patients treated by the doctor whose staff number is 603" in SQL. Table Treatment ( StaffNo , PatientID , StartDate , Reason ) – Prince May 2 '11 at 18:21
    
No inbuilt operator but double not exists or group by and count can do the job simple-talk.com/sql/t-sql-programming/… – Martin Smith May 2 '11 at 18:22
    
@Martin: Note that I said that there was not a direct translation, not that the same result was impossible. While what you suggest is a general-purpose solution, having more information (as the OP has provided) can often result in a clearer, more optimized solution. – Adam Robinson May 2 '11 at 18:24
1  
@Prince: Does it give you the results you expect? – Adam Robinson May 2 '11 at 19:14
1  
@Adam Robinson , I updated the answer That SQL did what I want. Informally it is equivalent to Relational Divide. @Martin , Thank you for your link , I found my answer in it At the END , THANK you everybody for your help – Prince May 2 '11 at 19:24

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