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My input file is:

-150     150    -90      130    1
-150     150    -150     170    1
-150     150    -110     140    1
-150     160    -80     -20     1
-150     170    -140     160    1
-150     170    -70     -40     1
-140    -170    -110     150    1
-140     130    -120     110    1
-140     140     160    -150    1
-140     160    -150     150    1

I need to create a python dictionary such that the key is the first two columns, and the value is another dictionary where key is 3+4 columns, and value is 5th column:

'-140 160' : {'-150 150' : 0.0188679245283019},
'-140 -170' : {'-110 150' : 0.0188679245283019},
'-150 170' : {'-140 160' : 0.0188679245283019, '-70 -40' : 0.0188679245283019},
'-150 160' : {'-80 -20' : 0.0188679245283019},
'-150 150' : {'-150 170' : 0.0188679245283019, '-110 140' : 0.0188679245283019}

So far I've been using a perl script to convert it to text that looks like what I show above, and then copy paste that text into my python code. (the value has become a fraction because I divided it by total sum, which was 56

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2  
FYI, you can use tuples as dictionary keys. That is often preferrable. In this case you can preserve the individual numbers of the first two columns and still use them as keys (in a tuple). – Keith May 2 '11 at 19:21
up vote 7 down vote accepted
from collections import defaultdict

bigdict = defaultdict(dict)
for ln in file:
    a,b,c,d,e = ln.split()
    bigdict[(a,b)][(c,d)] = e

If you want string keys, replace (a,b) with '%s %s' % (a, b) and similarly for (c,d).

share|improve this answer
3  
probably want to replace (a,b) with "%s %s"(a,b), and likewise for (c,d) to match the OP. – user227667 May 2 '11 at 19:12
    
@thouis: good point, added that to the answer. – Fred Foo May 2 '11 at 19:18
    
This works great. is this faster than using bigdict={}, followed by if (a,b) not in bigdict: bigdict[(a,b)] = {} ? – Mikhail May 2 '11 at 19:28
    
@Mikhail: it's certainly faster in terms of human comprehension :) If your data is so huge that it might make a difference, profile both options and pick the fastest. This is just the shortest and most Pythonic solution. – Fred Foo May 2 '11 at 19:30

This should work:

f = open('file')
dictionary = {}
for line in f:
    a, b, c, d, e = line.split()
    try:
        dictionary['%s %s' % (a, b)]['%s %s' % (c, d)] = e
    except KeyError:
        dictionary['%s %s' % (a, b)] = dict([('%s %s' % (c, d), e)])
share|improve this answer
    
wouldn't this overwrite the previous dict for duplicate (a,b) case? – Mikhail May 2 '11 at 19:23

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