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Can a typedef struct be used without knowing its type?

e.g. There is a module on another embedded microcontroller that expects a struct and the struct is sent from another board and the struct is a typedef struct. Can the expected struct be accessed. Can its data be read?

Another question that arises, is how are structs usually sent around systems and the developer using them needs to know the structs fields.

Are the modules that declared them just included and the developer needs to find out the fields?

Can structs data be accessed without knowing its fields?

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3 Answers 3

If you have an incomplete struct type, you should not be accessing its data. However, you can pass around pointers to that type just fine, and code that knows the complete type of the struct can access the data the pointer points to.

If you want to manipulate the data of the struct in two different modules, you will need to have the complete type declaration in both of them. This is usually put into a header file.

mystruct.h

#ifndef _MYSTRUCT_H
#define _MYSTRUCT_H

typedef struct mystruct{
     int a;
     int b;
} mystruct;

#endif

foo.c

#include "mystruct.h"

int foo(mystruct m){
    return m.a;
}

bar.c

#include "mystruct.h"

int bar(mystruct m){
    return m.b;
}
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My issue is a struct is declared on a system running on a panda board. Then code on the panda board sends these structs to an arduino board that wont have the module included.Should the arduino code redefine the struct on their board/system? –  Helium3 May 2 '11 at 19:41
1  
@Helium3 If you want to manipulate the struct with code on the arduino board, then yes, you need to have the full struct definition there as well. –  Null Set May 2 '11 at 19:44
    
Great thanks... –  Helium3 May 2 '11 at 19:50

To access any of the fields of a struct (whether or not it is typedefed) a complete declaration of the struct must be visible at the point where the code attempts to access the field. Which physical board produces the data is entirely irrelevant.

"Complete declaration" and "visible" are technical terms with precise definitions that are too lengthy to get into here. For what you're asking, this approximation should be good enough: a struct declaration is complete if and only if it has this form

struct foo {
  /* list of fields */
};

And it's visible if it appears at top level, textually above the function(s) that attempt to access fields of the struct. Usually, the declaration would come from a header file, but there's no requirement that it do so (remember that #include operates on text, not on the symbol table, unlike say Java import).

By contrast, if all you have is a declaration like this

struct foo;

then the type is incomplete and the only thing you can do with the struct (to first order) is pass around pointers to it.

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Can a typedef struct be used without knowing its type?

Well, both yes and no. You only need to include a header file declaring the struct if you need to access the fields, but you don't need to include if you are just passing a pointer forward, i.e. relaying some parameter as you are are moving between the abstraction layers.

Another question that arises, is how are structs usually sent around systems and the developer using them needs to know the structs fields.

When the struct has been declared and seen by the compiler, the compiler knows that struct of type X takes up so and so number of bytes in memory and how the data is ordered. If there are four 32 bits integers declared after each other, they will be aligned next to each other in memory for 128 bits or 16 bytes. The header file defines this like a contract. "If you include me, here's how many bytes I take up in memory and here are the different types that belong to me".

Are the modules that declared them just included and the developer needs to find out the fields?

I'm not really sure of what you mean here. The developer can also take a look at the header file (just like the compiler does) to see the SAME contract, but obviously explained through a higher abstraction layer, i.e. the human readable code. So he/she can know that the first field in the struct is called fooField. The developer then knows that he can access that field through that name or identifier, e.g.

NumberStruct someNumberStruct;
getSomeNumbers(&someNumberStruct);
int number = someNumberStruct.fooField;

Can structs data be accessed without knowing its fields?

Here's the yes from the first question. A pointer is just pointing to some address in memory, as long as you have access to write and read that memory, you can do anything. You could in fact pass around stuff as a void* (i.e. type less pointer) and manually read bytes from that same contract, you "know" that the struct is so and so large in memory and the order of the fields, because you have taken a look at the code :) It's obviously a bit dangerous since you must be sure that the other side of that contract hasn't changed, then fun stuff could happen :) So as soon as ANYTHING in some struct has changed, you must update all code that utilize that contract without including the header file.

Hope this could shed some light onto your structs :)

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