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I am learning the ASP.NET MVC 3 Framework. In my layout page (_Layout.cshtml), I would like to conditionally include some CSS stylesheets depending on the name of the controller. How do I do that?

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2  
Don't do it... If you have a single css file for your entire website in a static domain with a high cache your browser will make fewer requests and will already have the code necessary for any page. Look at SO source code, the is a single css file. (also a single js for the website) –  BrunoLM May 2 '11 at 19:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could obtain the current controller name using the following property:

ViewContext.RouteData.GetRequiredString("controller")

So based on its value you could include or not the stylesheet:

@if (ViewContext.RouteData.GetRequiredString("controller") == "somecontrollername")
{
    <link href="@Url.Content("~/Content/Site.css")" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
}

Or use a custom helper:

public static class CssExtensions
{
    public static IHtmlString MyCss(this HtmlHelper html)
    {
        var currentController = html.ViewContext.RouteData.GetRequiredString("controller");
        if (currentController != "somecontrollername")
        {
            return MvcHtmlString.Empty;
        }

        var urlHelper = new UrlHelper(html.ViewContext.RequestContext);
        var link = new TagBuilder("link");
        link.Attributes["rel"] = "stylesheet";
        link.Attributes["type"] = "text/css";
        link.Attributes["href"] = urlHelper.Content("~/Content/Site.css");
        return MvcHtmlString.Create(link.ToString(TagRenderMode.SelfClosing));
    }
}

and in layout simply:

@Html.MyCss()
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I would use different approach. Define base controller instead and define method SetStyleSheet like:

public abstract class BaseController : Controller
{
    protected override void Intialize(RequestContext requestContext)
    {
        base.Initialize(requestContext);
        SetStyleSheet();
    }

    protected virtual void SetStyleSheet()
    { }
}

In derived classes you can override SetStyleSheet to set something like ViewData["styleSheet"] and use it for example in your master page (_Layout.cshtml).

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Darin definitely answered your questions but an alternative would be use the controllers name as the id of some HTML element on your page, which would give you the flexibility of customizing controller-level views but keep your CSS in one file.

<body id="<%=ViewContext.RouteData.GetRequiredString("controller").ToLower() %>">
    ... content here
</body>
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I did another extension method for ControllerContext because ViewContext is aleady derived from it and you can call your method directly.

For example :

public static class ControllerContextExtensions
{
    public static string GetControllerName(this ControllerContext helper)
    {
        if (helper.Controller == null)
        {
            return string.Empty;
        }

        string[] fullControllerNames = helper.Controller.ToString().Split('.');

        return fullControllerNames[fullControllerNames.Length-1].Replace("Controller",string.Empty);
    }

}

And to use this in your _Layout :

@if(ViewContext.GetControllerName() == "MyControllerName")
{
  //load my css here
}

You could also pass in your controller name as parameter and make this extension method return a bool.

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