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i have a Class Library to hold my objects so:

xxxCommon\Objects\Customer.cs

    public class Customer
    {
        public string url { get; set; }
        public List<Telephone> telephones { get; set; }
    }

xxxData\DC\CustomerDC.cs (DataComponent)

  • This class call many procs and return objects in xxxCommon\Objects

My main problem now is circular reference, to make a "lazy" load i need to set the get of telephones atributes to a function in xxxData\DC, how can avoid this ?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

One way you can resolve a circular dependency is to have a layer in between your two assemblies:

Rather than this scenario;

Assembly Model:

public class Customer{ 
    //...
}

Assembly Data:

public class CustomerDAO{
    public Customer LoadCustomer(int id){
         return new Customer(id,...);
    }
}

where the Model assembly references the Data assembly and Data can't reach back into Model to instantiate a Customer.

You can have instead;

Assembly Model:

public class CustomerModel:Customer{}
public class ModelFactoryImp:ModelFactory{
    public Customer CreateCustomer(int id,//...customer params){
        return new CustomerModel(...);
    }
}

Assembly ModelInterfaces:

public abstract class Customer{//...}
public abstract ModelFactory{
    Customer CreateCustomer(int id,//...customer params);
}

Assembly Data:

public class CustomerDAO{
    private ModelFactory _modelFactory;

    public CustomerDAO(ModelFactory modelFactory){
         _modelFactory = modelFactory;
    }

    public Customer LoadCustomer(int id)
    { 
        // Data Access Code
        return _modelFactory.CreateCustomer(id,//...cutomer params);
    }
}

Where both Model and Data assemblies depend on the ModelInterfaces layer and you pass the Customer Data Access Object an implementation of the ModelFactory class so that it can create Customers.

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This looks like a suitable usage for WeakReferences - you don't want to hold the entire list of Customers/Telephones in cache at any time, correct? The API documentation actually uses management of a large cache as an example.

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You can work around circular references by using callback methods.

For example, class ActiveRecordSQL<T> has a default method for creating entities, but allows it to be overwritten.

private Func<T> GetNewEntity;

protected ActiveRecordSQL() // constructor
{
    GetNewEntity = DefaultGetNewEntity;
}

protected Result<T> GetWithCustomEntity(SqlCommand cmd, Func<T> GetCustomEntity)
{
    GetNewEntity = GetCustomEntity;
    return Get(cmd);
}

private T DefaultGetNewEntity()
{
    return new T();
}

protected T Populate(DataRow row, T existing)
{
    T entity = existing ?? GetNewEntity();
    entity.Populate(row);
    return entity;
}

A class that needs to pass a custom function can use a lambda expression, or pass a reference to its own function with the right signature.

        ReferrerInfo = dc.Referrers.GetCustomReferrer(referrerID, () => new ReferrerFacade()).Data as ReferrerFacade;

"GetCustomReferrer" calls intermediate methods that simply pass the method to "GetWithCustomEntity". "ReferrerFacade" subclasses an entity and lives in a different project. Passing the callback method allows calls "backward" across the existing reference.

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This is a good way if you are faced with the difficult task of resolving circular dependency, but shouldn't a good design eliminate such dependency in the first place. –  Shamim Hafiz May 3 '11 at 6:15
    
All designs are compromises, and in any complex system you will find areas where you need two-way communication between components. Functional programming offers a number of tools, such as callbacks, continuations, and closures. Another versatile and common solution for the problem is event handlers; the lower layer provides the event handler and raises events, while the upper layer registers an event handler to receive notifications. (Look at INotifyPropertyChanged in .NET for an excellent example.) Dependency injection offers another approach to resolving dependency issues. –  Cylon Cat May 3 '11 at 11:18

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