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I have config files and various documents that I want to copy from the dev environment to the dev-server directory using Maven2. Strangely, Maven does not seem strong at this task.


Some of the options:

  • Simple use a copy task in Maven

<copy file="src/main/resources/config.properties" tofile="${project.server.config}/config.properties"/>

  • Use the Ant plugin to execute copy from Ant.

  • Construct an artifact of type zip, alongside the "main" artifact of the POM which is usually of type jar, then unpack that artifact from the repository into the target directory.

  • maven-resources plugin, as mentioned below.

  • Maven Assembly plugin -- but this seems to require a lot of manual definitions, when I want to do things simply and "conventionally."

  • This page even shows how to build a plugin to do copying!

  • maven-upload plugin, as mentioned below.

  • maven-dependency-plugin with copy, as mentioned below.


All these seem needlessly ad hoc: Maven is supposed to excel at doing these standard tasks without fuss and bother.

Any advice?

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2  
Maven is build around the idea of a life cycle with phases, the copy random files to a remote server task does not really fit into this. Always think of your project as a whole. –  André Feb 27 '09 at 23:17
2  
"All these seem needlessly ad hoc: Maven is supposed to excel at doing these standard tasks without fuss and bother. " What you are doing isn't a standard task, per se. If your artifact was a war/ear, then this would be as simple as using the cargo plugin( cargo.codehaus.org/Maven2+plugin#Maven2plugin-get… ). What you are describing sounds highly specific to how you are doing deployments and not standard java application container deployments. Maven is not really geared to handle deploy time activities to live servers - it's geared more to build/dev activities. –  whaley Sep 9 '09 at 20:25
32  
@André: I hear that argument over and over again, but sorry, that's BS. There's nothing wrong with thinking of the project as a whole, but part of any decent build system should be functionality that lets me achieve task X in a straight forward way, such as copying files, and Maven cannot do that. There's a reason why so many projects popped up lately that embrace the build-scripts-are-code paradigm (like Gradle, SBT, or Buildr). –  Matthias Nov 17 '11 at 13:01
    
I would recommend having a pom.xml for building the artifacts and another for deploying a given artifact. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Mar 29 '12 at 8:20
    
All suggestions above still don't seem to allow me to copy a specific file from a different project/artifact into a maven project. I have some files under src/main/folder in an artifact that becomes a jar and I have tried using the dependency-copy maven plugin however I haven't found a way to say which files I want to copy and I get the whole jar file in the assembly file all the time. All the other suggestions here, like resources, doesn't seem to allow me to specify an artifact rather than the resources inside the project –  ByteFlinger Oct 12 '12 at 10:17

12 Answers 12

up vote 75 down vote accepted

Don't shy away from the Antrun plugin. Just because some people tend to think that Ant and Maven are in opposition, they are not. Use the copy task if you need to perform some unavoidable one-off customization:

<project>
  [...]
  <build>
    <plugins>
      [...]
      <plugin>
        <artifactId>maven-antrun-plugin</artifactId>
        <executions>
          <execution>
            <phase>deploy</phase>
            <configuration>
              <tasks>

                <!--
                  Place any Ant task here. You can add anything
                  you can add between <target> and </target> in a
                  build.xml.
                -->

              </tasks>
            </configuration>
            <goals>
              <goal>run</goal>
            </goals>
          </execution>
        </executions>
      </plugin>
    </plugins>
  </build>
  [...]
</project>

In answering this question, I'm focusing on the details of what you asked. How do I copy a file? The question and the variable name lead me to a larger questions like: "Is there a better way to deal with server provisioning?" Use Maven as a build system to generate deployable artifact, then perform these customizations either in separate modules or somewhere else entirely. If you shared a bit more of your build environment, there might be a better way - there are plugins to provision a number of servers. Could you attach an assembly that is unpacked in the server's root? What server are you using?

Again, I'm sure there's a better way.

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Is the task descriptor now deprecated? –  Matt Apr 19 '11 at 17:00
3  
@Matt Yes, the task parameter is now deprecated (Antrun Plugin). You should use target instead (since 1.5). Unfortuately there are examples which mix this up; e.g. target parameter and version < 1.5. –  cuh Oct 19 '11 at 13:51
<build>
    <plugins>
        ...
        <plugin>
            <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
            <artifactId>maven-resources-plugin</artifactId>
            <version>2.3</version>
        </plugin>
    </plugins>
    <resources>
        <resource>
            <directory>src/main/java</directory>
            <includes>
                <include> **/*.properties</include>
            </includes>
        </resource>
    </resources>
    ...
</build>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Peter, that was useful. I now use the resources-plugin copy-resources goal instead of antrun. The latter is actually much simpler and intuitive to define, but I couldn't get it (version 1.3) to pass all Maven custom properties (defined in <properties> section) to antrun, so I switched to resources-plugin. –  Cornel Masson Mar 2 '10 at 18:45
    
I used to think this was the correct answer ... until I realized that the resources plugin doesn't have a skip configuration. Antrun is the way to go. –  Mike Post Oct 10 at 21:41

The maven dependency plugin saved me a lot of time fondling with ant tasks:

<plugin>
    <artifactId>maven-dependency-plugin</artifactId>
    <executions>
        <execution>
            <id>install-jar</id>
            <phase>install</phase>
            <goals>
                <goal>copy</goal>
            </goals>
            <configuration>
                <artifactItems>
                    <artifactItem>
                        <groupId>...</groupId>
                        <artifactId>...</artifactId>
                        <version>...</version>
                    </artifactItem>
                </artifactItems>
                <outputDirectory>...</outputDirectory>
                <stripVersion>true</stripVersion>
            </configuration>
        </execution>
    </executions>
</plugin>

The dependency:copy is documentend, and has more useful goals like unpack.

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The ant solution above is easiest to configure, but I have had luck using the maven-upload-plugin from Atlassian. I was unable to find good documentation, here is how I use it:

<build>
  <plugin>
    <groupId>com.atlassian.maven.plugins</groupId>
    <artifactId>maven-upload-plugin</artifactId>
    <version>1.1</version>
    <configuration>
       <resourceSrc>
             ${project.build.directory}/${project.build.finalName}.${project.packaging}
       </resourceSrc>
       <resourceDest>${jboss.deployDir}</resourceDest>
       <serverId>${jboss.host}</serverId>
       <url>${jboss.deployUrl}</url>
     </configuration>
  </plugin>
</build>

The variables like "${jboss.host}" referenced above are defined in my ~/.m2/settings.xml and are activated using maven profiles. This solution is not constrained to JBoss, this is just what I named my variables. I have a profile for dev, test, and live. So to upload my ear to a jboss instance in test environment I would execute:

mvn upload:upload -P test

Here is a snipet from settings.xml:

<server>
  <id>localhost</id>
  <username>username</username>
  <password>{Pz+6YRsDJ8dUJD7XE8=} an encrypted password. Supported since maven 2.1</password>
</server>
...
<profiles>
  <profile>
    <id>dev</id>
    <properties>
      <jboss.host>localhost</jboss.host> 
      <jboss.deployDir>/opt/jboss/server/default/deploy/</jboss.deployDir>
      <jboss.deployUrl>scp://root@localhost</jboss.deployUrl>
    </properties>
  </profile>
  <profile>
    <id>test</id>
    <properties>
       <jboss.host>testserver</jboss.host>
       ...

Notes: The Atlassian maven repo that has this plugin is here: https://maven.atlassian.com/public/

I recommend downloading the sources and looking at the documentation inside to see all the features the plugin provides.

`

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I've had very good experience with copy-maven-plugin. It has a much more convenient and concise syntax in comparison to maven-resources-plugin.

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3  
Unfortunately, copy-maven-plugin is not compatible with maven 3.1.x –  Hakan Oct 12 '13 at 13:22
1  
The issue tracking the compatibility with maven 3.1 is there: github.com/evgeny-goldin/maven-plugins/issues/10 –  koppor Jan 29 at 12:59

That seems like the sort of thing that is out-of-scope for default Maven. Is there a plugin for the specific server you're using? That would probably be the "Maven Way™".

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I can only assume that your ${project.server.config} property is something custom defined and is outside of the standard directory layout.

If so, then I'd use the copy task.

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Let's say I take care to put the files into the standard directory layout. Can Maven copy them to the target as-is, not in a zip/jar? –  Joshua Fox Feb 25 '09 at 19:24

To summarize some of the fine answers above: Maven is designed to build modules and copy the results to a Maven repository. Any copying of modules to a deployment/installer-input directory must be done outside the context of Maven's core functionality, e.g. with the Ant/Maven copy command.

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Well, maven is not supposed to be good in doing fine granular tasks, it is not a scripting language like bash or ant, it is rather declarative - you say - i need a war, or an ear, and you get it. However if you need to customize how the war or ear should look like inside, you have a problem. It is just not procedural like ant, but declarative. This have some pros in the beginning, and could have a lot of cons at the end.

I guess the initial concept was to have fine plugins, that "just work" but the reality is different if you do non-standard stuff.

If you however put enough effort in your poms and few custom plugins, you'll get a much better build environment as with ant for example (depends on you project of course, but it gets more and more true for bigger projects).

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+1 nice explanation. –  cbmeeks Sep 20 '13 at 21:20

Another way is to bundle these things into an artifact using the assembly plugin. Then you can use the dependency plugin to unpack these files where you want. There are also copy goals in the dependency plugin to copy artifacts.

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I was able to piece together a number of different sources for this answer:

...
<repository>
    <id>atlassian</id>
    <name>Atlassian Repo</name>
    <url>https://maven.atlassian.com/content/repositories/atlassian-public</url>
</repository>
...
<dependency>
    <groupId>com.atlassian.maven.plugins</groupId>
    <artifactId>maven-upload-plugin</artifactId>
    <version>1.1</version>
</dependency>
...
<plugin>
    <groupId>com.atlassian.maven.plugins</groupId>
    <artifactId>maven-upload-plugin</artifactId>
    <version>1.1</version>
    <configuration>
        <serverId>jira-repo</serverId>
        <resourceSrc>
            ${project.build.directory}/${project.build.finalName}.${project.packaging}
        </resourceSrc>
        <resourceDest>opt/jira/webapps</resourceDest> <!-- note: no leading slash -->
        <url>scp://root@jira</url>
    </configuration>
</plugin>
...

From ~/.ms/settings.xml

...
<servers>
  <server>
    <id>jira-repo</id>
    <username>myusername</username>
    <password>mypassword</password>
  </server>
</servers>
...

Then run the command: (the -X is for debug)

mvn -X upload:upload

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What to copy-maven-plugin, so it doesn't work with maven 3 because of some backward-compatibility problems of the mojo dependency:

look at this issue: https://github.com/evgeny-goldin/maven-plugins/issues/10

[INFO] --- copy-maven-plugin:0.2.5:copy (create-archive) @ hotelpraktikum ---
[WARNING] Error injecting: com.github.goldin.plugins.copy.CopyMojo
java.lang.NoClassDefFoundError: Lorg/sonatype/aether/RepositorySystem;
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