Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following constant in my user.rb file that is used for a select drop down menu in one of my forms. It saves a numerical value.

In my view, when I obtain that saved numerical value, can I use this constant to retrieve the name that corresponds with it and display it? Or do I have to make a separate array that deals with this?

LANGPROFICIENCY = [
  ["Elementary proficiency",           1],
  ["Limited working proficiency",      2],
  ["Professional working proficiency", 3],
  ["Full professional proficiency",    4],
  ["Native or bilingual proficiency",  5]
]
share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First, a hash is a great starting point for this sort of data. Instead of:

LANGPROFICIENCY = [
  ["Elementary proficiency",           1],
  ["Limited working proficiency",      2],
  ["Professional working proficiency", 3],
  ["Full professional proficiency",    4],
  ["Native or bilingual proficiency",  5]
]

use:

LANGPROFICIENCY = {
  "Elementary proficiency"           => 1,
  "Limited working proficiency"      => 2,
  "Professional working proficiency" => 3,
  "Full professional proficiency"    => 4,
  "Native or bilingual proficiency"  => 5
}

You can grab the keys or values separately if you want, making it convenient when you need them individually, or you can look-up the key to find the value, like always.

From there you can reverse the hash:

Hash[*LANGPROFICIENCY.to_a.map{ |a| a.reverse }.flatten]

which will return:

{
  1 => "Elementary proficiency",
  2 => "Limited working proficiency",
  3 => "Professional working proficiency",
  4 => "Full professional proficiency",
  5 => "Native or bilingual proficiency"
}

making it easy to do reverse lookups.

Taking all that one step farther, if you know there won't be collisions, which there shouldn't be:

LANGPROFICIENCY = LANGPROFICIENCY.merge( Hash[ *LANGPROFICIENCY.to_a.map{ |a| a.reverse }.flatten ] )

which results in:

{
  "Elementary proficiency"           => 1,
  "Limited working proficiency"      => 2,
  "Professional working proficiency" => 3,
  "Full professional proficiency"    => 4,
  "Native or bilingual proficiency"  => 5,
  1 => "Elementary proficiency",
  2 => "Limited working proficiency",
  3 => "Professional working proficiency",
  4 => "Full professional proficiency",
  5 => "Native or bilingual proficiency"
}

You can look up either way, forward or backwards. It does mess up your ability to grab just the keys or the values, but you can figure out a way around that at one of the intermediate steps.

I use this trick all the time, or variations on this theme. It makes it very easy to map back and forth using one variable.

Now, if you've been trying each step in IRB or in Ruby, you will have received multiple warnings about "warning: already initialized constant LANGPROFICIENCY". The answer to that is to use a variable instead of a constant. Besides, LANGPROFICIENCY is hardly a readable variable name. I'd recommend using lang_proficiency or something similar.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you want to get the name,

LANGPROFICIENCY.rassoc(2)[0] #=> "Limited working proficiency"

But if your array is to have the numerical value in the ascending order, you have much of a redundancy here. Instead of what you have, you can simplify it to:

LANGPROFICIENCY = [
  "Elementary proficiency",
  "Limited working proficiency",
  "Professional working proficiency",
  "Full professional proficiency",
  "Native or bilingual proficiency"
]

and do

LANGPROFICIENCY[2-1] #=> "Limited working proficiency"
share|improve this answer
    
interesting, thank you. however, i'm getting an uninitialized constant error in my view...is there something I need to do in my model to make this available to my view? –  stewart715 May 2 '11 at 21:57
    
You have to define the constant before you call it. So put the LANG... = earlier in the code. You can put it somewhere earlier in the class body where you have the methods that call it. If you are not going to use it in the model, you can put it in the view. –  sawa May 2 '11 at 21:58
add comment

LANGPROFICIENCY is an array of arrays. Ignore that it's a constant, it just means you can't change it.

selected_entry = LANGPROFICIENCY.select {|entry| entry[1] == selected_id }

>> LANGPROFICIENCY = [["Elementary proficiency",1], ["Limited working proficiency",2], ["Professional working proficiency",3], ["Full professional proficiency",4], ["Native or bilingual proficiency",5]]
=> [["Elementary proficiency", 1], ["Limited working proficiency", 2], ["Professional working proficiency", 3], ["Full professional proficiency", 4], ["Native or bilingual proficiency", 5]]

>> selected_id = 3
=> 3

>> selected_entry = LANGPROFICIENCY.select {|entry| entry[1] == selected_id }                                                     
=> [["Professional working proficiency", 3]]

>> selected_entry.flatten
=> ["Professional working proficiency", 3]

Assume that your selected index is in selected_id and has the value 3: Now you have an array that matches the entry in LANGPROFICIENCY.

share|improve this answer
    
Apologies for the formatting. I couldn't get the editor to play nice nice with the code blocks for some reason. –  Jeff Paquette May 2 '11 at 21:44
    
when you create an answer you can click on the orange "?" to the top right of the edit box to get tips on formatting. –  the Tin Man May 3 '11 at 3:05
    
@the tin man, Thanks, I know...I think the editor state got confused with the cutting & pasting. –  Jeff Paquette May 3 '11 at 11:13
    
and thanks for cleaning it up! –  Jeff Paquette May 3 '11 at 11:13
add comment

You could create a helper method for your view, that uses this constant to retrieve a proficiency from an integer.

Your helper could look like this:

def proficiency_from_value value
  return LANGPROFICIENCY.flatten[2 * (value - 1)]
end
share|improve this answer
    
I think this needs to be LANGPROFICIENCY.flatten[2 * (value-1)] –  Jeff Paquette May 2 '11 at 21:46
    
@Jeff - Yep, edited :) –  Amokrane Chentir May 2 '11 at 21:55
    
perfecto....thanks! –  stewart715 May 2 '11 at 22:07
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.