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I have the following code:

        double ticketPrice;
        LoadOperation loGetTickets = ticketClass.loadTickets();
        loGetTickets.Completed += (s, args) =>
        {
            foreach (Web.Ticket tt in ticketClass.getContext())
            {
                if (tt.bookingId == data.bookingId)
                {
                    pView.lblTicketAmount.Content = "£" + tt.ticketPrice;
                    MessageBox.Show("Price: " + tt.ticketPrice);
                    ticketPrice = Convert.ToDouble(tt.ticketPrice);
                    pView.lblTicketName.Content = tt.ticketName;
                    break;
                }
            }
        }; double subTotal = ticketPrice + ticketQuantity;

When I do run it, I get the error: Use of unassigned local variable 'ticketPrice'

As you can see it does get assigned with a value from the loop.

If I do use:

double ticketPrice = 0.0;

The error goes but then the value stays at 0.0, but I don't understand because the messagebox comes up every time and outputs the value, so I would assume the value of tt.ticketPrice is populating ticketPrice

Can anyone help me on this matter.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
I've never seen a runtime error "Use of unassigned local variable" just a compile time error that sort. – Jared Updike May 2 '11 at 21:34
1  
Is this a trick question? The assignment comes after two lines which use the value of ticketPrice. – user565869 May 2 '11 at 21:34
3  
@Jon of All Trades: uh no it doesn't - tt.ticketPrice has no relation to ticketPrice (apart from similar names). – rsenna May 2 '11 at 21:42
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're saying that the value of ticketPrice stays zero, but the code doesn't show the place where you read the value of the variable!

The behavior would make sense if it was used in some code that follows the snippet that you posted. E.g.:

double ticketPrice;        
LoadOperation loGetTickets = ticketClass.loadTickets();        
loGetTickets.Completed += (s, args) =>  { 
  // Set value of 'ticketPrice'
  ticketPrice = ...
};

// Use the value of the variable
Console.WriteLine(ticketPrice); // (*)

This doesn't work, because the line marked as (*) actually completes before the value of the variable is set in the Completed handler. To make it work, you'll need to move the code that uses the variable into the handler (after the code that sets the variable value).

Then it, of course, doesn't make sense to declare the variable in the method, because it will be only used in the body of the lambda function, so you'll end up with something like this:

LoadOperation loGetTickets = ticketClass.loadTickets();        
loGetTickets.Completed += (s, args) =>  { 
  double ticketPrice;        
  // Set value of 'ticketPrice'
  ticketPrice = ...

  // Use the value of the variable
  Console.WriteLine(ticketPrice); // (*)
};

I believe you just discovered the pain-point of asynchronous programming in C# 4 :-). That's why F# supports asynchronous workflows (where you can write the same code witout event handlers) and why C# designers are thinking about adding similar thing to C# in the future.

share|improve this answer
    
OK I understand you, since the query hasn't finished processing it doesn't have time to use tt.ticketPrice in ticketPrice before the code finishes executing? – Sandeep Bansal May 2 '11 at 21:50
    
OK all I did was just move the calculations into the event. Works now, but I guess I have to just try and avoid that. Thanks for the info! – Sandeep Bansal May 2 '11 at 21:56
    
@Sandeep: Yes, that's exactly the problem. The handler isn't guaranteed to complete before the execution of the main method moves to the next line (and uses ticketPrice). When starting some asynchronous operation (that takes a handler), the rest of the calling method doesn't generally need to contain much code. – Tomas Petricek May 2 '11 at 22:11

While ticketPrice does get set in the loop, it is inside an event handler. Since that event has the possibility of never firing (as far as the compiler is concerned) it will treat it as unassigned until it comes across a line that is guaranteed to run.

share|improve this answer

Move the double ticketPrive; statement to inside the foreach and all will be well.

share|improve this answer
    
if it's inside the foreach the question arises why have it in the first place? – BrokenGlass May 2 '11 at 21:38
    
It can only be used inside of the lambda expression, so move it there! – Richard Schneider May 2 '11 at 21:40
    
That is not correct, it can also be used outside the event handler. However, then of course you have to wait until the event has happened. – Guffa May 2 '11 at 21:53

The variable does get assigned, but that happens later on.

The code for assigning the variable is in an event handler, so that code doesn't run until the event happens, and that is after the tickets are loaded.

If you try to use the variable immediately, it won't be set. You can't use the variable until after the event has occured. The easiest way to do that is to put the code that uses the variable inside the event handler.

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