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I'm currently trying to integrate some animation drawing code of mine into a third party application, under the form of an external plugin.

This animation code in realtime 3d, based on OpenGL, and is supposed to render as fast as it can, usually at 60 frames per second.

In my base application, where I'm the king of the world, I control the application message pump, so that drawing occurs whenever possible. Like that :

for (;;)
{
  if (PeekMessage(&msg, NULL, 0, 0, PM_REMOVE))
  {
    do
    {
      if (msg.message == WM_QUIT) break;
      TranslateMessage(&msg);
      DispatchMessage(&msg);
    } 
    while (PeekMessage(&msg, NULL, 0, 0, PM_REMOVE));
  }

  draw();
}

Now that I'm no more king in the world, I have to play nice with the application messages, so that it keeps being responsive. To my knowledge, as I'm a plugin, I can't hijack the whole application message pump ; so I tried various things, doing my drawing in WM_PAINT message handler :

  • Use WM_TIMER, which doesn't work :I don't know in advance which time step I need (often not fixed) and the timing in not accurate.
  • Call InvalidateRect as soon as I'm done drawing, doesn't work : completely prevents the rest of the application of being responsive and doing its own refreshing.
  • Create a 'worker' thread, whose only job is to post a user message to the plugin window. This message is posted as soon as the drawing is finished (signaled by an event). The user message handler, in turn, calls InvalidateRect (see there).

    So far, my last attempt is the better, and sometimes work fine.

    DWORD WINAPI PaintCommandThreadProc(LPVOID lpParameter)
    {
      Plugin* plugin = static_cast<Plugin*>(lpParameter);
      HANDLE updateEvent = plugin->updateEvent();
    
      while (updateEvent == plugin->updateEvent())
      {
        ::WaitForSingleObject(updateEvent, 100);
        ::Sleep(0);
        if (updateEvent == plugin->updateEvent())
        {
          ::PostMessage(plugin->hwnd(), WM_USER+0x10, 0, 0);
        }
      }
      return 0;
    }
    
    ...
    
    LRESULT CALLBACK PluginWinProc(HWND hWnd, UINT msg, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam)
    {
      bool processDefault = true;
      LRESULT result = 0;
    
      Plugin* plugin = reinterpret_cast<Plugin*>( GetWindowLong(hWnd, GWL_USERDATA) );
    
      switch (msg) {
        ...
        case WM_GL_MESSAGE:
          {
            ::InvalidateRect( hWnd, NULL, FALSE );
            processDefault = false;
            result = TRUE;
          }
          break;
    
        case WM_PAINT:
          {
            draw(hWnd);
            ::SetEvent( plugin->updateEvent() );
            processDefault = false;
            result = TRUE;
          }
          break;
        ...
      }
    
      if (processDefault && plugin && plugin->m_wndOldProc)
        result = ::CallWindowProc(plugin->m_wndOldProc, hWnd, msg, wParam, lParam);
    
      return result;
    }
    

    On some occasions, the host application still seems to miss messages. The main characteristics of the problem are that I have to press the 'Alt' key for modal dialogs to show up ; and I have to move the mouse to give some processing time to the host application !...

    Is there any 'industry standard' solution for this kind of as-often-as-you-can animation repaint problem ?

  • share|improve this question

    1 Answer 1

    up vote 1 down vote accepted

    Each thread has its own message queue, and messages sent to a window arrive in the queue of the thread that created the window. If you create your plugin window yourself, you can create it in a separate thread, and that way you will have complete control over its message pump.

    An alternative solution (which imho is better), is to only have OpenGL rendering in a separate thread. All OpenGL calls must occur in the thread that created the OpenGL context. However, you can create a window in one thread (your application main thread), but create the OpenGL context in another thread. That way the original application message pumps stays intact, and in your rendering thread you can loop forever doing rendering (with calls to SwapBuffers to vsync).

    The main problem with that second solution is that communication between the plugin WindowProc and the rendering loop must take into account threading (ie. use locks when accessing shared memory). However since the message pump is separate from rendering, it can be simultaneous, and your message handling is as responsive as it can get.

    share|improve this answer
        
    Agreed, I can't think of any other way to have the plugin render as fast as possible without adapting the host application. –  Coincoin Feb 25 '09 at 18:57
        
    Thanks for this suggestion ! It looks like a very good idea ! I'll give it try ASAP - I never thought that OpenGL rendering could be entirely done in an autonomous thread. –  rotoglup Feb 27 '09 at 6:36

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