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The code below generates:
Name's hashCode
Name's hashCode
Name's equals
ID=0

import scala.collection.mutable
object TestTraits {
  def main(args: Array[String]): Unit = {
    val toto0 = new Person(0,"toto")
    val toto1 = new Person(1,"toto")
    val peoples = mutable.Set.empty[PersonID]
    peoples.add(toto0)
    peoples.add(toto1)
    peoples.foreach(_.showID)
    //peoples.foreach(_.saySomething)//won't compile'
  }
}

trait Name{
  var theName=""
  override def hashCode(): Int = {
    println("Name's hashCode")
    var hash = 5;
    hash = 71 * hash + this.theName.##;
    hash
    //super.hashCode()//infinite loop
  }

  override def equals(that: Any): Boolean = {
    println("Name's equals")
    that match {
    case that: Name     => this.theName.equals(that.theName)
    case _ => false
    }
  }
}

abstract class PersonID{
  val idNumber: Int

  override def hashCode(): Int = {
    println("PersonID's hashCode")
    super.##
  }
  override def equals(that: Any): Boolean = {
    println("PersonID's equals")
    that match {
    case that: PersonID     => this.eq(that)
    case _ => false
    }
  }
  def showID: Unit = {
    println("ID=" + idNumber)
  }
}

class Person(val id:Int, val s:String) extends {
  val idNumber=id
} with PersonID with Name {
  /*override def hashCode(): Int = {
    println("Person's hashCode")
    super.## //infinite loop !!
  }
  override def equals(that: Any): Boolean = {
    println("Person's equals")
    that match {
    case that: Person     => this.eq(that)
    case _ => false
    }
  }*/
  theName=s
  def saySomething: Unit = {
    print("Hello, my name is " + theName + ", ")
    showID
  }
}

Since "peoples" is a set of PersonID, I was expecting the following output:
PersonID's hashCode
PersonID's hashCode
ID=0
ID=1

Does someone can explain this behavior and how to do what I expected (that is, to have a class with "equals" based on values of fields except when putting the instance in a Set[PersonID])

Another mystery is why I get infinite loops when I use super.hashCode() in my custom hashCode ?

PS: I use a pre initialized abstract member because I need it in my real use case...

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I get this instead:

Name's hashCode
Name's hashCode
Name's equals
ID=0

This happens because Name is the last trait in the initialization, so it's overrides of hashCode and equals will be the first to be called. You wanted Set to call methods based on the static type (ie, what has been declared), which is just not how OO works. If that were true, inheritance and overriding would be all but useless.

As for how to accomplish what you want... you can't. It would be nice if there was a Set which took an Equal[A] type class, but there isn't. Maybe Scalaz has it.

By the way, there's a call to super.## which is deemed illegal on Scala 2.9.0.rc2. I'm not sure what that means yet.

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Thanks for your answer, now it is clear that I have to implement this differently. –  acapola May 4 '11 at 10:46

Another mystery is why I get infinite loops when I use super.hashCode() in my custom hashCode ?

Outside of boxed numerics, the entire implementation of ## is to call hashCode.

In your implementation of hashCode, you are calling (or trying to call) ##.

Mystery solved!

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I think that no recursion should take place as I intended to call super.hashCode(), not this.hashCode(). Like you, I was thinking that hashCode and ## are really the same method but after changing ## by hashCode(), the infinite loop disappear... –  acapola May 4 '11 at 10:53
    
I'm pretty sure of how it works, since I wrote it. ## calls hashCode. I'm not sure what part of this is unclear to you or I'd elaborate further. –  extempore May 5 '11 at 6:01
    
What was unclear was the fact that I get infinite loop despite calling super.##. Another guy on scala forum gave me the following explanation: "Your infinite loops are caused by the use of super.## from within the definition of a hashCode method. Calling x.## will translate to calling ScalaRunTime.hash(x) which, in turn for a descendant of AnyRef, will call x.hashCode(). Using super here doesn't help you. If you use super.hashCode() then you will get the behaviour you seem to be expecting." –  acapola May 7 '11 at 13:31

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