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class me {
   private $name;
   public function __construct($name) { $this->name = $name; }
   public function work() {
       return "You are working as ". $this->name;
   }
   public static function work() {
       return "You are working anonymously"; 
   } 
}

$new = new me();
me::work();

Fatal error: Cannot redeclare me::work()

the question is, why php does not allow redeclaration like this. Is there any workaround ?

share|improve this question
4  
Yes there's a workaround: use another name. ;-) PHP is not C++, methods are unique by their names, not by their name/arguments/visibility combination. Even then, you cannot overload an object method to a static method in C++ either. –  netcoder May 3 '11 at 1:24
    
Does any language allow this? I know C# does not - stackoverflow.com/questions/160118/… –  Phil May 3 '11 at 1:25
    
but it's neat to use same name to do same thing isn't it? –  Rizky Ramadhan May 3 '11 at 1:28
    
@Rizky Not if they do different things –  Phil May 3 '11 at 1:29
    
@Rizky: Not really, it just creates ambiguity for no reason, because if both methods would do the exact same thing, you wouldn't need both. Just make the constructor's $name argument an optional parameter and put an if in your work() method. –  netcoder May 3 '11 at 1:30
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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

There is actually a workaround for this using magic method creation, although I most likely would never do something like this in production code:

__call is triggered internally when an inaccessible method is called in object scope.

__callStatic is triggered internally when an inaccessible method is called in static scope.

<?php

class Test
{
    public function __call($name, $args)
    {
        echo 'called '.$name.' in object context\n';
    }

    public static function __callStatic($name, $args)
    {
        echo 'called '.$name.' in static context\n';
    }
}

$o = new Test;
$o->doThis('object');

Test::doThis('static');

?>
share|improve this answer
    
god ! this is what i'm looking for, thanks :D –  Rizky Ramadhan May 3 '11 at 2:21
    
@rizky: no worries :) –  Demian Brecht May 3 '11 at 2:24
    
aniway, is there any reason why not using this in production? –  Rizky Ramadhan May 6 '11 at 6:49
add comment

Here is how I think you should do it instead:

class me {
   private $name;

   public function __construct($name = null) { 
       $this->name = $name; 
   }

   public function work() {
       if ($this->name === null) {
           return "You are working anonymously"; 
       }
       return "You are working as ". $this->name;
   }
}

$me = new me();
$me->work(); // anonymous

$me = new me('foo');
$me->work(); // foo
share|improve this answer
    
The "anonymous" one is not static. –  Malfist Jan 9 at 19:59
    
@Malfist: It never claimed to be. It's an alternative solution. Read the answer properly next time. Static methods should be avoided as much as possible, and the OP's use case is not one where a static method is warranted. –  netcoder Jan 9 at 21:22
    
Why should static functions be avoided as much as possible? There are perfectly good reasons for static functions, plus the reduce complexity by reducing the scope. Static functions are good programming. That being said, OP's use case was not one where static was warranted, I agree, but it may have just be a sample the OP thought up to exhibit the behavior he wants. –  Malfist Jan 9 at 21:32
    
@Malfist: Not going to argue with someone who says things like "static functions are good programming" (what does that even mean?). Besides, there's plenty to read about it. And it doesn't change the fact that you totally missed the point. –  netcoder Jan 9 at 23:07
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