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Let's say I have this:

var blockedTile = new Array("118", "67", "190", "43", "135", "520");

There's more array elements but those are just few for readability purposes. Anyways, I could do a "for" loop but it would do 500 loops everytime you click on the map... is there any other way to see if a certain string is in an array?

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Look at this post here: stackoverflow.com/questions/926580/… –  webdad3 May 3 '11 at 2:18
3  
@Jeff That's got nothing to do with it. –  alex May 3 '11 at 2:20

8 Answers 8

up vote 65 down vote accepted

Try this:

if(blockedTile.indexOf("118") != -1)
{  
   // element found
}
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9  
This doesn't work for old browsers (like IE < 9). There's a jQuery function for this: api.jquery.com/jQuery.inArray –  Vinicius Pinto Oct 5 '12 at 14:42
1  
A faster way is to flip the bit wise if(!!~blockedTile.indexOf('118)) this method will always return true if the result > -1 and false if result === -1 –  bm_i Nov 5 '12 at 19:01
3  
@bm_i Which faster? Faster to type? –  alex Oct 2 '13 at 20:01
    
indexOf() can also be applied on literal arrays, e.g. if (-1 == [84, 116].indexOf(event.keyCode)). Tested on Chrome 37.0.2062.122. –  François Sep 24 at 16:58

Some browsers support Array.indexOf().

If not, you could augment the Array object via its prototype like so...

if (!Array.prototype.indexOf)
{
  Array.prototype.indexOf = function(searchElement /*, fromIndex */)
  {
    "use strict";

    if (this === void 0 || this === null)
      throw new TypeError();

    var t = Object(this);
    var len = t.length >>> 0;
    if (len === 0)
      return -1;

    var n = 0;
    if (arguments.length > 0)
    {
      n = Number(arguments[1]);
      if (n !== n) // shortcut for verifying if it's NaN
        n = 0;
      else if (n !== 0 && n !== (1 / 0) && n !== -(1 / 0))
        n = (n > 0 || -1) * Math.floor(Math.abs(n));
    }

    if (n >= len)
      return -1;

    var k = n >= 0
          ? n
          : Math.max(len - Math.abs(n), 0);

    for (; k < len; k++)
    {
      if (k in t && t[k] === searchElement)
        return k;
    }
    return -1;
  };
}

Source.

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Use Underscore.js

It cross-browser compliant and can perform a binary search if your data is sorted.

_.indexOf

_.indexOf(array, value, [isSorted]) Returns the index at which value can be found in the array, or -1 if value is not present in the array. Uses the native indexOf function unless it's missing. If you're working with a large array, and you know that the array is already sorted, pass true for isSorted to use a faster binary search.

Example

//Tell underscore your data is sorted (Binary Search)
if(_.indexOf(['2','3','4','5','6'], '4', true) != -1){
    alert('true');
}else{
    alert('false');   
}

//Unsorted data works to!
if(_.indexOf([2,3,6,9,5], 9) != -1){
    alert('true');
}else{
    alert('false');   
}
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Or Lodash, it's the same thing ;) (lodash.com) –  Arthur Oct 10 at 13:36
function in_array(needle, haystack){
    var found = 0;
    for (var i=0, len=haystack.length;i<len;i++) {
        if (haystack[i] == needle) return i;
            found++;
    }
    return -1;
}
if(in_array("118",array)!= -1){
//is in array
}
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OP didn't want a loop –  JNF Jun 18 at 7:00
if(array.indexOf("67") != -1) // is in array
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Depending on the version of JavaScript you have available, you can use indexOf:

Returns the first index at which a given element can be found in the array, or -1 if it is not present.

Or some:

Tests whether some element in the array passes the test implemented by the provided function.

But, if you're doing this sort of existence check a lot you'd be better of using an Object to store your strings (or perhaps an object as well as the Array depending on what you're doing with your data).

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I'd use a different data structure, since array seem to be not the best solution.

Instead of array, use an object as a hash-table, like so:

(posted also in jsbin)

var arr = ["x", "y", "z"];
var map = {};
for (var k=0; k < arr.length; ++k) {
  map[arr[k]] = true;
}

function is_in_map(key) {
  try {
    return map[key] === true;
  } catch (e) {
    return false;
  }
}


function print_check(key) {
  console.log(key + " exists? - " + (is_in_map(key) ? "yes" : "no"));
}

print_check("x");
print_check("a");

Console output:

x exists? - yes
a exists? - no

That's a straight-forward solution. If you're more into an object oriented approach, then search Google for "js hashtable".

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Why don't you use Array.filter?

var array = ['x','y','z'];
array.filter(function(item,index,array){return(item==YOURVAL)}).

Just copy that into your code, and here you go:

Array.prototype.inArray = function (searchedVal) {
return this.filter(function(item,index,array){return(item==searchedVal)}).length==true
}
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