Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Is it possible to create an object with a constructor parameter which returns a property value when referenced, without using dot notation? Here's a few examples:

public class myObject
{
    public string myObject {get; private set;}
    public myObject( string tempstring)
    {
        this.myObject = tempstring.ToUpper();
    }
}

var a = new myObject("somevalue");
Console.WriteLine( myObject ); // outputs the string "SOMEVALUE"

Here's another attempt:

public class myInt
{
    public int myInt {get; private set;}
    public myInt(string tempInt)
    {    this.myInt = Convert.ToInt32(tempInt);
    }
}

var a = new myInt("3");
var b = a + a;   // ends up being an int datatype value of 6

I know I could always do var b = a.myInt + a.myInt. I guess I could create a static class with a static function that converts a parameter each time to a result, but it wouldn't maintain state.

Just curious. It would make what I am actually trying to do much less difficult.

share|improve this question

In the first case, yes. Override the ToString method.

public class myObject
{
    public string myValue {get; private set;}
    public myObject( string tempstring)
    {
        this.myValue = tempstring.ToUpper();
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return myValue;
    }
}

In the second case, sort of. You shouldn't try to overload operators to offer unexpected behavior. Create a method to perform behavior that wouldn't make sense when reading the code. What you are suggesting (returning an int) would definitely not be expected by me to return an int (mostly because of the var rather than a strictly defined type). Using the + operator to return a new myInt object would make sense. Using the + operator return an int would not.

You could overload the + operator to return a new myInt object, and then also add an implicit cast to int. Just make sure it makes sense, and that it is readable.

Within the class, you could use:

public static implicit operator int(myInt m) 
{
    return myValue;
}

public static myInt operator +(myInt left, myInt right) 
{
    // requires constructor that takes int
    return new myInt(left.myValue + right.myValue);
}

Of course, you could go the direct route, but again only use it when it makes it more readable and not less (note, just like methods operators cannot be overloaded simply by return type, so you'd have to pick between the two).

public static int operator +(myInt left, myInt right) 
{
    return left.myValue + right.myValue;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The public static implicit operator int( myInt m) is what I am looking for, except in my actual case it would be something like public static implicit operator Expression.Lambda<Func<Product, bool>>( myCondition m) where m is a specification written as a string (where clause) and it implicitly converts it to a lambda expression. (still trying to work it out.) – Dr. Zim May 3 '11 at 4:20
    
Can you show your desired usage (with the Lambda)? Obviously it might be rough around the edges, otherwise you wouldn't need to ask, but try doing it with an explicit cast at first and hopefully we can work to implicit. – pickypg May 3 '11 at 4:23
    
That will be rough, but I will give it a try. It may take a while. – Dr. Zim May 3 '11 at 4:27
    
linqspecs.codeplex.com is very similar to what I am trying to do. At the bottom they mention "The AdHocSpecification is an alternative way to write an spec without writing a class. You should not abuse of them, and try to write those in a single place as explained above. Also AdHocSpecification doesn't implement Equals, so two AdHocSpecifications are equal only if they are the same instance." – Dr. Zim May 6 '11 at 15:13

How about implicit conversions. See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/z5z9kes2(VS.71).aspx

share|improve this answer
2  
Nothing says thanks like an accepted answer. – Richard Schneider May 3 '11 at 4:19
    
+1 on the explanation link. It's exactly what I am looking for, which is also in pickypg's answer. – Dr. Zim May 3 '11 at 4:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.