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I am now using PyExcelerator for reading excel files, but it is extremely slow. As I always need to open excel files more than 100MB, it takes me more than twenty minutes to only load one file.

The functionality I need are:

  • Open Excel Files, Select Specific Tables, And Load Them Into a Dict or List object.
  • Sometimes: Select Specific Columns And Only Load Whole Lines Which Have the Specific Columns in Specific Values.
  • Read Excel Files With Password Protected.

And the code I am using now is:

book = pyExcelerator.parse_xls(filepath)
parsed_dictionary = defaultdict(lambda: '', book[0][1])
number_of_columns = 44
result_list = []
number_of_rows = 500000
for i in range(0, number_of_rows):
    ok = False
    result_list.append([])
    for h in range(0, number_of_columns):
        item = parsed_dictionary[i,h]
        if type(item) is StringType or type(item) is UnicodeType:
            item = item.replace("\t","").strip()
        result_list[i].append(item)
        if item != '':
            ok = True
    if not ok:
        break

Any suggestions?

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried other libraries yet? (I have no technical knowledge about this subject, I'm just interested) – Trufa May 3 '11 at 4:20
    
Yes i tried, but those always have no functionality with writing xls. After reading the big xlses I have to do some calculating and save results to a small xls too. – Felix Yan May 3 '11 at 4:24
    
@FelixYan: Ok good to know, hope you get some good answers! – Trufa May 3 '11 at 4:30
2  
For the writing part you could use xlwt or, if you're just writing values, you could use CSV format (which can be easily imported into Excel). – las3rjock May 3 '11 at 4:33
    
Does the 20 minutes include just the pyExcelerator.parse_xls() or are you counting your own subsequent code? – John Machin May 3 '11 at 4:36
up vote 5 down vote accepted

pyExcelerator appears not to be maintained. To write xls files, use xlwt, which is a fork of pyExcelerator with bug fixes and many enhancements. The (very basic) xls reading capability of pyExcelerator was eradicated from xlwt. To read xls files, use xlrd.

If it's taking 20 minutes to load a 100MB xls file, you must be using one or more of: a slow computer, a computer with very little available memory, or an older version of Python.

Neither pyExcelerator nor xlrd read password-protected files.

Here's a link that covers xlrd and xlwt.

Disclaimer: I'm the author of xlrd and maintainer of xlwt.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you and I'll try these two. In fact I am using AMD Phenom II X4 945 with 4G RAM and 2G or more of them are free, SSD, and Python 2.7 in a x86_64 Linux OS. The reading process can be even slower somewhere else. – Felix Yan May 3 '11 at 4:48

xlrd is pretty good for reading files and xlwt is pretty good for writing. Both superior to pyExcelerator in my experience.

share|improve this answer

You could try to pre-allocate the list to its size in a single statement instead of appending one item at a time like this: (one large allocation of memory should be faster than many small ones)

book = pyExcelerator.parse_xls(filepath)
parsed_dictionary = defaultdict(lambda: '', book[0][1])
number_of_columns = 44
number_of_rows = 500000
result_list = [] * number_of_rows 
for i in range(0, number_of_rows):
    ok = False
    #result_list.append([])
    for h in range(0, number_of_columns):
        item = parsed_dictionary[i,h]
        if type(item) is StringType or type(item) is UnicodeType:
            item = item.replace("\t","").strip()
        result_list[i].append(item)
        if item != '':
            ok = True
    if not ok:
        break

If doing this gives appreciable performance increase you could also try to preallocate each list item with the number of columns and then assign them by index rather than appending one value at a time. Here's a snippet that creates a 10x10, two-dimensional list in a single statement with an initial value of 0:

L = [[0] * 10 for i in range(10)]

So folded into your code, it might work something like this:

book = pyExcelerator.parse_xls(filepath)
parsed_dictionary = defaultdict(lambda: '', book[0][1])
number_of_columns = 44
number_of_rows = 500000
result_list = [[''] * number_of_rows for x in range(number_of_columns)]
for i in range(0, number_of_rows):
    ok = False
    #result_list.append([])
    for h in range(0, number_of_columns):
        item = parsed_dictionary[i,h]
        if type(item) is StringType or type(item) is UnicodeType:
            item = item.replace("\t","").strip()
        result_list[i,h] = item
        if item != '':
            ok = True
    if not ok:
        break
share|improve this answer
    
The problem is, I don't know the size of the xls file. So the number_of_rows variable is only the maximum size I guess. So ... will the pre-allocate take too much memory? – Felix Yan May 3 '11 at 4:40
    
You know the number of columns but not the rows? Is the column count fixed? In any case, it might be worth a try. Do a performance comparison of subsets with the two different algorithms, on say 1000 rows. You can gauge from there. – Paul Sasik May 3 '11 at 4:43
    
Thank you. It worths a try of course :P. And you are right, the columns count is fixed, and I don't know the number of rows. – Felix Yan May 3 '11 at 4:44
    
You could establish the number of rows by iterating until item != '' and just incrementing a counter. It would be an extra step before the assignment but that would establish the upper bound. – Paul Sasik May 3 '11 at 4:49
    
Another thing you could do is look at your process with a Performance Monitoring app. Watch for memory growth and especially page faults. Page faults will smother a nested loop like yours and preallocation is a good way to get around them. – Paul Sasik May 3 '11 at 4:53

Unrelated to your question: If you're trying to check if none of the columns are empty string, then you set ok = True initially, and do this instead in the inner loop (ok = ok and item != ''). Also, you can just use isinstance(item, basestring) to test whether a variable is string or not.

Revised version

for i in range(0, number_of_rows):
    ok = True
    result_list.append([])
    for h in range(0, number_of_columns):
        item = parsed_dictionary[i,h]
        if isinstance(item, basestring):
            item = item.replace("\t","").strip()
        result_list[i].append(item)
        ok = ok and item != ''

    if not ok:
        break
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! I have been not comfortable with the type(item) is StringType or type(item) is UnicodeType thing for so long! But I don't think the ok = ok and item != '' easy to read afterwards, only a little hacky :) – Felix Yan May 3 '11 at 5:03

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