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I'm looking for exactly the same behavior as

git add -i -p

But instead of composing a commit from my working directory, I'd like to compose my working directory from (parts of) a commit. How can I do that ?

My use case is that I have several distinct features that are grouped together in a single commit and I'd like to test them one by one

Using cherry-pick -n is not really satisfactory, since it leaves me with the dirty job of removing all the unrequired code. I'd really just like to pick the selected changes I want to test.

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Well, the real solution is to split commits, so you won't be stuck with 'all the unrequired code' to remove in the first place. My money is on cherry-pick, not git reset (always a bit dangerous) –  sehe May 3 '11 at 5:45
    
Of course I will split the commits, I just need to find out what to split (and what to discard) –  krosenvold May 3 '11 at 5:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Using cherry-pick -n is not really satisfactory, since it leaves me with the dirty job of removing all the unrequired code. I'd really just like to pick the selected changes I want to test.

The job may have been a dirty one before, but with the advent of git checkout --patch, you can now selectively discard changes, similar to git add -p for adding.

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Oh, that's a sweet one. Exactly what I needed. Note that it might be wise to rebase/cherry pick the commit on top of your target commit if your target is not an ancestor of the cherry –  krosenvold May 3 '11 at 19:52
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omg, this command is heaven on earth! –  Jacob Krieg Jun 24 '13 at 0:07

You could use git reset --mixed HEAD^1 to revert the index, then pick the hunks you want with git add -i.

The reset will roll back the index to the previous commit (essentially un-committing whatever was the HEAD), but it won't touch the working tree. You can now stage the hunks you want, commit them and throw away the rest with a git reset --hard HEAD.

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+1 As a very small note, --mixed is the default for git reset, so you could just leave that option out. –  Mark Longair May 3 '11 at 10:13

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